HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Levelling, The
Dog Days
Annabelle Creation
Once Upon a Time in Shanghai
Sssssss
Woman in Question, The
Atomic Blonde
Doulos, Le
Okja
Bob le Flambeur
Wedding in White
Léon Morin, Priest
Napping Princess, The
Scorpions and Miniskirts
Berlin File, The
Beaches of Agnès, The
Blue Jeans
Garokawa - Restore the World
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets
Gleaners & I, The
Peter of Placid Forest
Golden Bird, The
War for the Planet of the Apes
One Sings, the Other Doesn't
Great Gilly Hopkins, The
Little Prince and the Eight-Headed Dragon
Doom
Cléo from 5 to 7
Ballerina
Night Flight from Moscow
   
 
Newest Articles
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
The Melville Mood: His Final Two Films on The Melville Collection Blu-ray
Always Agnès: 3 from The Varda Collection Blu-ray
Re: Possession of Vehicles - Killer Cars, Trucks and a Vampire Motorcycle
The Whicker Kicker: Whicker's World Vols 5&6 on DVD
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
Two Sides of Sellers: The Party vs The Optimists
Norse Code: The Vikings vs The Long Ships
Over the Moon - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 2
   
 
  Coonskin Why Can't We All Just Get Along?Buy this film here.
Year: 1974
Director: Ralph Bakshi
Stars: Philip Michael Thomas, Barry White, Charles Gordone, Scatman Crothers
Genre: Comedy, Thriller, Animated, Weirdo
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: A convict tells the story of three friends, a rabbit, a fox and a bear, who moved up to Harlem to take on the gangsters and police at their own game.

Ralph Bakshi's audacious, exuberant, in-your-face mix of live action and animation caused a lot of controversy when it was first released, with many accusing it of racism, despite his protests. It's a sort of twisted Uncle Remus tale, with the "Brer Rabbit" running up against and outwitting preachers, black militants, corrupt cops, pimps and the Mafia in his drive to succeed.

The cartoon characters make no attempt to hide their stereotypical origins: what Bakshi does is use the prejudiced view of these blacks (and whites, and gays) and turn these images back on themselves in the most over-the-top fashion to confront the viewer. America itself is depicted as looking like a Wonder Woman-style superheroine, but with a wicked heart (and with a gun in her, erm... yes).

Much of the imagery is powerful and surreal, which, coupled with the rambling storyline, makes for a heady combination. Coonskin is not as offensive as you might think, but I can't see anything like it being made these days. And Hong Kong Phooey will never sound the same again. Also with: no rotoscoping, which makes a nice change.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 10848 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Ralph Bakshi  (1938 - )

American animator of edgy, often adult-oriented cartoons. He spent a few years directing shorts for TV before branching out on his own with the R. Crumb adaptation Fritz the Cat. He continued in this frank approach for Heavy Traffic and the controversial Coonskin, and then switched to fantasy with The Lord of the Rings, Wizards and Fire and Ice. American Pop and Hey Good Lookin' also had fans, and he returned to TV to revive Mighty Mouse in the 1980s.

When the 1990s comeback Cool World was a flop, Bakshi's directing work wound down, and he now concentrates on his paintings, with occasional returns to animation.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
Keith Rockmael
Paul Shrimpton
Ian Phillips
Jensen Breck
   

 

Last Updated: