HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Frozen II
White Sheik, The
Whalebone Box, The
Hunt, The
Invisible Man, The
Honey Boy
System Crasher
Judy & Punch
Bacurau
Battling Butler
Vivarium
Seven Chances
Dogs Don't Wear Pants
Navigator, The
Knives Out
Hit!
Charlie's Angels
Passport to Shame
Le Mans '66
Keep Fit
Doctor Sleep
Friend or Foe
Brass Target
Mine and the Minotaur, The
Sky Pirates
Syncopation
Sea Children, The
Ghost of a Chance, A
Go Kart Go
Great Buster, The
Seventy Deadly Pills
Wings of Mystery
Treasure at the Mill
VFW
Crime Wave
Terminator: Dark Fate
Slithis
Antonio Gaudi
Oscar, The
Color Out of Space
   
 
Newest Articles
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
Godzilla Goes to Hollywood
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
   
 
  Shaolin Brothers Throw The Shaolin
Year: 1977
Director: Joseph Kuo
Stars: Carter Wong, Tang Wei, Tong Li, Chin Mong
Genre: Martial Arts, HistoricalBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: A typically barmy slice of seventies kung fu, Shaolin Brothers is one of those films that feels like its been compiled from two or three different movies with similar looking actors. It starts coherently enough — Ko Lung (Carter Wong) is a General in the Ching army (the bad guys) who invites his old colleague Lin Yun to join him; Lin however remains loyal to the Mings (the good guys). They have a fight. Meanwhile, three Taoists are in possession of a set of Ching plans that could be very harmful if they were to end up in the hands of the Mings. Following this?

So a runner is sent on a cross-country trip to deliver the plans, but in order to take the heat off him, a set of decoy plans are also given to some dude called General Hang, who comes up with a stupidly elaborate scheme to smuggle them out. This involves pretending to be dead, and being taken out of the city as a corpse by a local mortician. Only these corpses are enchanted and can jump of their own accord... and there are some thieves also pretending to be dead... and there's a foxy woman who can disappear at will.... and... oh, who cares?

But although the plot is impossible to follow, Shaolin Brothers is not without merit. Joseph Kuo was one of Hong Kong's most prolific directors during the seventies, and he directs the action scenes with an energy that many of his contemporaries lacked. There's quite a bit of wire work, which while undeniably shoddy compared to modern standards, was pretty unusual for the time, and the editing is fast and tight. Carter Wong was a hugely popular martial arts star back then, and he proves a charismatic villain; it's just a shame that so much time is given to the tedious smuggling-dead- bodies subplot rather than the kung fu... which, let's face it, is surely the only reason for watching.

Aka: Lu Si Niang Chuang Shaolin
Reviewer: Daniel Auty

 

This review has been viewed 4487 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Joseph Kuo  ( - )

Prolific Hong Kong martial arts director who worked steadily throughout the 70s and early 80s. Operated independently from the powerful Shaw Brothers studio, turning out numerous no-frills, well-made kung fu period films that made the most of often limited budgets. Worked with actor Carter Wong in several films, such as The 18 Bronzemen, Born Invincible, Shaolin Brothers and The Blazing Temple. Kuo’s other films include The 36 Deadly Styles, Dragon's Claws, The Mystery of Chess Boxing and The World of Drunken Master.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: