HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Journey to the West: The Demons Strike Back
Detective Conan: The Phantom of Baker Street
Lost in Paris
Goodbye Lover
Mouse Story: The Adventures of George and Gerald
Young Dragons: Kung Fu Kids
Spider-Man: Homecoming
Amazing Mr. X, The
Haunted House Elf
Lost & Found
Reformation
Abyss, The
Agent 505: Death Trap in Beirut
Lured
Jem and the Holograms
Burning of Red Lotus Monastery, The
Bag Boy Lover Boy
Sleepless Night
Willy McBean and His Magic Machine
Robbery
Tag
Never Back Down
Doraemon: Nobita's Little Star Wars
Kriminal
It Comes at Night
Strangled
Mojin - The Lost Legend
Poison Ivy
Celine and Julie Go Boating
Union Station
   
 
Newest Articles
Re: Possession of Vehicles - Killer Cars, Trucks and a Vampire Motorcycle
The Whicker Kicker: Whicker's World Vols 5&6 on DVD
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
Two Sides of Sellers: The Party vs The Optimists
Norse Code: The Vikings vs The Long Ships
Over the Moon - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 2
Alpha Males and Females - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 1
Animated Anxieties: From the Era of the Creepiest Cartoons
Manor On Movies--Clegg (1970)
   
 
  Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell You Can't Get The Parts These DaysBuy this film here.
Year: 1973
Director: Terence Fisher
Stars: Peter Cushing, Shane Briant, Madeline Smith, David Prowse, John Stratton, Charles Lloyd Pack, Bernard Lee, Patrick Troughton, Philip Voss, Chris Cunningham
Genre: Horror, Historical
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Dr Simon Helder (Shane Briant) is arrested after performing experiments on recently dead bodies stolen from the local graveyard, and is sent to an asylum for the criminally insane for five years. When he gets there, he discovers that the place is being run in secret by Baron Victor Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) who has been believed dead but is in fact continuing his experiments on the inmates...

After the failed comedy style of Horror of Frankenstein, this instalment looked like a reunion of the old Hammer team. Written by Anthony Hinds under his John Elder pseudonym, Hammer coaxed Terence Fisher out of retirement, and Peter Cushing returned in the role that made him famous. However, the nostalgia behind the scenes didn't translate to the screen, and the end result, the last Hammer Frankenstein, was a grey, drab and forlorn effort.

Although chiefly a retread of past glories, the film isn't a dead loss. Cushing's Baron is as icily villainous as ever, with his clipped diction, matter of fact references to "homicidal tendencies" and the like, and drive for scientific breakthroughs at any cost and with no sense of morality. As the film progresses, Helder changes from being his willing disciple to a sickened bystander, thoroughly repulsed by what he had earlier embraced as pioneering. By the end, Frankenstein has become a hopeless case and the asylum is the best place for him.

There are plenty of pathetic souls in the institution; one nice aspect of the production is that every inmate has their own quirks, even the extras. As the prison doctor, the Baron first conveys a sensitivity towards the unfortunates, but it's not long before he's betraying them by exploiting their bodies for his experiments. A lumbering brute who attempts suicide becomes the vessel for artistic hands and the brain of a genius - in Frankenstein's world, talent and skill reside in body parts and God is an irrelevance.

Naturally, it all goes wrong, with the Baron's vile plans for breeding his monster with a mute servant girl (Madeline Smith) amounting to nothing when the creature goes on a rampage. This predictability does nothing to help the film, but the odd item of black humour, such as the Baron accidentally stepping on a discarded brain, helps offset the grottiness of the gore scenes and piteous characters. Not the the best way to end a horror icon's career, but even the film agrees that Frankenstein's time, in this incarnation at least, had passed. Music by James Bernard (of course).
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5026 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Keith Rockmael
Paul Shrimpton
Enoch Sneed
Ian Phillips
Jensen Breck
   

 

Last Updated: