HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Dark Tower, The
Better Watch Out
Beguiled, The
Year of the Comet
Levelling, The
Dog Days
Annabelle Creation
Once Upon a Time in Shanghai
Sssssss
Woman in Question, The
Atomic Blonde
Doulos, Le
Okja
Bob le Flambeur
Wedding in White
Léon Morin, Priest
Napping Princess, The
Scorpions and Miniskirts
Berlin File, The
Beaches of Agnès, The
Blue Jeans
Garokawa - Restore the World
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets
Gleaners & I, The
Peter of Placid Forest
Golden Bird, The
War for the Planet of the Apes
One Sings, the Other Doesn't
Great Gilly Hopkins, The
Little Prince and the Eight-Headed Dragon
   
 
Newest Articles
Music, Love and Flowers: Monterey Pop on Blu-ray
The Melville Mood: His Final Two Films on The Melville Collection Blu-ray
Always Agnès: 3 from The Varda Collection Blu-ray
Re: Possession of Vehicles - Killer Cars, Trucks and a Vampire Motorcycle
The Whicker Kicker: Whicker's World Vols 5&6 on DVD
The Empress, the Mermaid and the Princess Bride: Three 80s Fantasy Movies
Witching Hour: Hammer House of Horror on Blu-ray
Two Sides of Sellers: The Party vs The Optimists
Norse Code: The Vikings vs The Long Ships
Over the Moon - Space: 1999 The Complete Series on Blu-ray Part 2
   
 
  Frozen Dead, The The cryo gameBuy this film here.
Year: 1966
Director: Herbert J. Leder
Stars: Dana Andrews, Anna Palk, Philip Gilbert, Kathleen Breck, Karel Stepanek, Edward Fox
Genre: Horror, Trash
Rating:  0 Votes
Review: Nazis on ice. Well, stored in the refrigerator, at any rate. The Frozen Dead formed one half of a particularly paltry pairing from Goldstar Films in the mid-sixties, with director Herbert J. Leder also responsible for It! starring Roddy McDowall. His imported fading star for this earlier picture was Dana Andrews, playing a German scientist hidden away in the English countryside, having kept a number of military personnel in cryogenic stasis since World War Two, awaiting the day when he can thaw them out in a bid to revive the glory days of the Third Reich. Unexpectedly, his young niece and her best friend turn up at his mansion (isn’t that always the way, mad scientists?) and begin poking around in places they shouldn’t, resulting in the lopping-off of one unfortunate girl’s head.

Cheap-looking, slow moving and very, very silly, The Frozen Dead is nevertheless memorable for the frequent scenes depicting the uniformed corpse-popsicles, the horde of failed zombie experiments huddled in the basement, and the wall of severed, electronically-controlled arms (about as far removed from the poetry of Cocteau’s La Belle Et La Bete as possible, despite the visual similarities!). As for the disembodied head, shot in an eerie blue-green light and with perspex-encased pulsating brain on display, this proves to be remarkably affecting, a real testament to the performance of Kathleen Breck who manages to convey the desperation, hopelessness and tragedy of her predicament to genuine effect. Deservedly taking centre stage during the film’s climax, Breck uses the power of her mind to control the adjacent row of dangling, strangling limbs before featuring in a quite stunning closing shot, mouthing the words “Bury me” over and over again to the fade-out.

Reviewer: Darrell Buxton

 

This review has been viewed 6730 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Robin Askwith
Mark Wahlberg
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
Keith Rockmael
Paul Shrimpton
Ian Phillips
Jensen Breck
   

 

Last Updated: