HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Halloween Kills
Cicada
Sun Shines Bright, The
Last Thing Mary Saw, The
Comets
Herself
Mon Oncle d'Amerique
Wild Strawberries
Runner, The
Don't Look Up
Ghostbusters: Afterlife
Eternals
Forever Purge, The
Memoria
Venom: Let There Be Carnage
Legend of La Llorona, The
Japon
Glasshouse
Perdita Durango
Commando, The
Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror
Boiling Point
Malignant
Deadly Games
Ailey
Voyeurs, The
Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes
In the Earth
Hiroshima Mon Amour
Hotel Poseidon
Zola
No Time to Die
Klaus
Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey
Candyman
Power of the Dog, The
StageFright
Voyage of Time: An IMAX Documentary
Suicide Squad, The
One Night in Miami...
   
 
Newest Articles
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
Vestron Double Bill: Dementia 13 and The Wraith
Farewell Dean Stockwell: His Years of Weirdness
Kung Fu Craft: Cinematic Vengeance! on Blu-ray
999 Letsbe Avenue: Gideon's Way on Blu-ray
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
   
 
  Maltese Bippy, The Sock It To Them
Year: 1969
Director: Norman Panama
Stars: Dan Rowan, Dick Martin, Carol Lynley, Julie Newmar, Mildred Natwick, Fritz Weaver, Robert Reed, David Hurst, Dana Elcar, Leon Askin, Alan Oppenheimer, Edra Gale, Arthur Batanides, Pamela Rodgers, Jennifer Bishop, Maudie Prickett, Garry Walberg
Genre: ComedyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: In Flushing, New York, there has been a gruesome murder committed in a cemetery, and one woman reported being alarmed by a man who made howling noises. Well, that's about it, hope you enjoyed the movie - wait, here are Dan Rowan and Dick Martin to introduce the rest of it, Dick was wrong, that wasn't all there is. First they have to get past the credits, and the two leading men quip their way through it, with Dick hoping this is the kind of story where they walk off into the sunset at the end, but we haven't even established what the funnymen are supposed to be doing in this. Turns out their playing two opportunists who when we catch up with them are shooting a nudie movie...

Don't worry, this was rated G at the time so there was no chance of seeing Rowan and Martin in saucy situations, though there were a few of their slightly off-colour gags, which would go over the heads of their younger fans. They certainly did have fans in the sixties and into the early seventies, but it was not down to their appearance in this effort, it was because they were stars of the hit comedy sketch show Laugh-In, which launched a few careers, most notably that of Goldie Hawn. It didn't launch Rowan and Martin's careers, however, as they had already been working steadily for years, mostly as nightclub comedians but they also had a movie under their belts, Once Upon a Horse from around ten years before this.

For most of their fans, this was to all intents and purposes their debut - that previous big screen work didn't exactly set the box office alight, but then again, neither did The Maltese Bippy. In fact, as tends to be the case with television stars, potential cinema audiences don't feel like paying to see them when they could stay at home and watch them for free, and as a result the duo scurried back to the small screen when this flopped completely, never making another film together, indeed for Rowan he never made another film full stop. Martin went on to a successful run of television direction, often comedy, once his star had faded, but Rowan made only a few appearances as a guest star before his untimely death.

Their relationship, Rowan the straight man smoothie and Martin the pixelated funny one, was preserved in this vehicle, though their grounding in a very basic comic partnership - even on TV, there was something very traditional about their professional personalities - meant that the plot could have been borrowed from any number of vintage nineteen-forties old dark house mystery runarounds. In fact, it was only rarely here that they got to live up to their endlessly irreverent style, most notably in the ending which they decide they dislike so go through variations until they settle on something, if not satisfying, then at least adequate since there are no more characters left to concoct any more story around.

Bits like that would have been better capitalised on for the rest of the movie, but in the main it's the sort of thing director Norman Panama would have penned for Bob Hope twenty years before, only Hope would have corralled his team of gag men to punch up the script with better jokes. For the first half we're bogged down in a bunch of clues to try and work out what is happening and whether Martin is a werewolf or not, which does bring about a very strange nightmare sequence as he is covered in hairy makeup and chased down the streets, whereupon Rowan shows up as a vampire who stakes him (huh?). The supporting cast was welcome at any rate, with Carol Lynley as Martin's love interest, Julie Newmar with an accent as a possible vamp and Fritz Weaver as her brother who may be a vampire himself, though disappointingly everything potentially supernatural is dispensed with in the second half for a more conventional approach - until that "we really don't care because it really doesn't matter" ending. The Maltese Bippy was a relic, but only mildly diverting. Music by Nelson Riddle.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2045 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: