HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Treasure City
Piccadilly
Parallel
Invasión
Shiva Baby
Flowers of Shanghai
War and Peace
Agony
Merrily We Go to Hell
Ellie & Abbie (& Ellie's Dead Aunt)
Amusement Park, The
Lemebel
Hands of Orlac, The
Cats
Death has Blue Eyes
Caveat
Kala Azar
Duplicate
Flashback
Gunda
After Love
Earwig and the Witch
Zebra Girl
Skull: The Mask
Vanquish
Bank Job
Drunk Bus
Homewrecker
State Funeral
Army of the Dead
Initiation
Redoubt
Dinner in America
Death Will Come and Shall Have Your Eyes
PG: Psycho Goreman
Maeve
Sound of Metal
Things of Life, The
Auschwitz Escape, The
Jungle Fever
   
 
Newest Articles
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
   
 
  Battle Royale 2: Requiem Kids These Days...
Year: 2003
Director: Kinji Fukasaku, Kenta Fukasaku
Stars: Tatsuya Fujiwara, Ai Maeda, Shûgo Oshinari, Ayana Sakai, Haruka Suenaga, Yuma Ishigaki, Miyuki Kanbe, Masaya Kikawada, Yoko Maki, Yuuki Ito, Riki Takeuchi, Sonny Chiba, Takeshi Kitano
Genre: Action, War, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  3 (from 6 votes)
Review: Three years have passed since the infamous Battle Royale massacre, and one of the kids that survived the bloody game – Shuya Nanahara (Tatsuya Fujiwara) – has set up a terrorist group, declaring war on Japan’s adults. A new game is established by the government, and the 42 randomly-selected school kids are this time given the task of storming the terrorists' island fortress to kill Nanahara within three days – or they themselves will be terminated.

Battle Royale’s thrilling mix of jet-black satire and gory teenage violence made it one of 2000’s most controversial films, and this sequel doesn’t mess around in trying to out-shock it. Requiem opens with the destruction of a pair of twinned skyscrapers in a huge city (presumably Tokyo), and ends with the surviving terrorists taking refuge in an unnamed Middle Eastern country; in between there’s a talk of the ‘Evil Empire’ that controls most of the world and debate as to the moral implications of terrorism. Which is all very well, but the rest plays out like a tedious war movie with none of the original’s savage wit or demented energy.

Veteran director Kinji Fukasaku died during the making of Requiem, his son Kenta taking up the reins. And boy, does it show. The film starts promisingly enough with a near-identical retread of the original's opening sequence, where the unlucky kids are fitted with explosive neck braces and informed of the deadly game they have been chosen for. Instead of Takeshi Kitano’s weary schoolteacher we have scenery-chewing military boss Riki Takeuchi (best known for Takashi Miike’s Dead or Alive films) and a neat twist – each teenager is paired with another, and when one dies, their partner’s neck brace will detonate. Quite how this helps their mission I’m not sure – it just means the kids die quicker – but it does provide plenty of opportunities for some splattery deaths.

Once the kids begin their task of landing on the island and trying to reach Nanahara’s fortress, it becomes less a biting satire and more a teen Saving Private Ryan. Fukasaku uses that jerky combat photography that Spielberg pioneered in his war epic, and the action is certainly excitingly directed. But one of the most shocking visual elements of the first film – that these kids are wearing school uniforms while they slaughter each other – is removed when we have the whole lot wearing identical army outfits. Battle Royale 2 maintains the gimmick of having the names of the dead appear on the screen alongside a countdown of how many of the original 42 are left, but it all seems a little redundant since Fukasaku has clearly given up on the concept of this being a ‘game’ designed to scare the shit out of Japan’s errant youth.

At 130 minutes even the action grows tiresome; there’s a plodding mid-section when the remaining teens team up with Nanahara and his gang and reflect on what their lives have come to, before it's back to the gunfights as a load of adult soldiers storm the island. Sonny Chiba pops up in a cameo, as does Takeshi Kitano in a brief flashback, and Riki Takeuchi has an amusingly bizarre death scene. It’s bloody and brutal, but also shmaltzy and monotonous. Game over methinks.

AKA: Battle Royale II: Revenge (extended original version)

[Tartan Video's limited edition 3 disc tinset gives fans of this film a treat with disc 1 featuring the movie as reviewed above, disc 2 covers the extended version of the original movie (or Revenge as it's known) whilst disc 3 consists of all the extra material including four behind-the-scenes faturettes, cast and crew interviews, 'making of the music' feature and teaser trailer]
Reviewer: Daniel Auty

 

This review has been viewed 13182 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Kinji Fukasaku  (1930 - 2003)

Japanese director whose long career took in science fiction such as The Green Slime, Message From Space and Virus and gangster movies such as Yakuza Graveyard, Street Mobster and Graveyard of Honour. He also co-directed Tora! Tora! Tora! In 2000 scored a big international hit with the savage satire Battle Royale. Died whilst making a sequel, which was completed by his son Kenta.

Kenta Fukasaku  (1973 - )

Son of the late, great Japanese director Kinji Fukasaku who scripted his father’s satire Battle Royale and took over directing the sequel, Battle Royale 2: Requiem when Kinji died in 2003.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
Andrew Pragasam
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: