HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
True Don Quixote, The
Babymother
Mitchells vs. the Machines, The
Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Unholy, The
How to Deter a Robber
Antebellum
Offering, The
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  Talos the Mummy Underwrapped
Year: 1998
Director: Russell Mulcahy
Stars: Jason Scott Lee, Louise Lombard, Sean Pertwee, Lysette Anthony, Michael Lerner, Jack Davenport, Honor Blackman, Christopher Lee, Shelley Duvall, Gerard Butler, Jon Polito, Ronan Vibert, Elizabeth Power, Roger W. Morrissey
Genre: HorrorBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: Archaeologist Sir Richard Turkel (Christopher Lee) unearths the ancient Egyptian tomb of evil sorcerer Talos. He immediately realizes he has made a terrible mistake but despite his warnings his arrogant financiers push on with the excavation. All hell breaks loose as the interlopers are slain by supernatural forces until Turkel seals the tomb at the cost of his own life. Fifty years later Turkel's granddaughter, Samantha (Louise Lombard), heads another scientific expedition into Talos' tomb that claims the life of her fiancé, Burke (a pre-stardom Gerard Butler), drives colleague Bradley Cortese (Sean Pertwee) insane and unleashes Talos upon an unsuspecting modern world. A few more years pass before the mysterious death of an American embassy official draws dogged cop Riley (Jason Scott Lee) to London. He unearths a string of bizarre, seemingly unconnected murders that appear to be committed by escaped mental patient Cortese. But when Riley reaches out to Samantha and her fellow scientists, Dr. Claire Mulrooney (Lysette Anthony) and Professor Marcus (Michael Lerner), his skepticism gives way to horror. It appears a disembodied Talos is enacting a blood ritual so when the stars align he will rise again and rule the world.

Mummy movies made a most unexpected comeback throughout the Nineties albeit of a largely underwhelming sort including the Harry Allan Towers backed Tony Curtis vehicle The Mummy Lives (1993) and Bram Stoker update Legend of the Mummy (1997). A pet project for music video maven and genre fan Russell Mulcahy, Talos the Mummy was intended to put such shambolic efforts in the shade as a state-of-the-art spectacle but plagued by production and distribution difficulties lost the race to Stephen Sommers' even more amped-up, crowd-pleasing The Mummy (1999). Shorn of thirty-two minutes, a seemingly mutilated cut went straight to video somewhat ironically re-titled Russell Mulcahy's Tale of the Mummy. Unlike Sommers' rollercoaster ride Mulcahy went for a more ominous, albeit knowing, Hammer horror vibe evident from the iconic presence of Christopher Lee in a nicely atmospheric prologue and a scene recreating the famous shotgun blast to the mummy's chest from Terence Fisher's 1959 version of The Mummy.

Coupled with the action unfolding in a grimy, rainsoaked B-movie vision London rather than the sunny sandscapes of Egypt, such knowing winks might initially endear Talos the Mummy to vintage monster movie fans but alas, the film suffers from Mulcahy's usual sloppy storytelling. Co-written by Mulcahy along with Keith Williams and John Esposito, the cheesy script features some atrocious dialogue and treads a fine line between loving tribute and simply embodying the worst clichés of B-movie horror. To Mulcahy's credit this mummy movie strives for something besides the usual antics of a shambling corpse in bandages incorporating black magic rituals, astrological phenomena, reincarnation, psychics and pitting twentieth century technology against ancient Egyptian sorcery. The high concept extends to the special effects by the KNB group that involve animated bandages engulfing screaming victims before Talos eventually morphs into an underwhelming and laughably chatty bald, naked deity. Unfortunately Mulcahy overreaches with his attempt at Lovecraftian scope and dawdles excessively through not one, but two prologues before establishing his plot. The story ends up violating its own loopy logic for the sake of cheap scares and one deeply dopey twist ending.

An eclectic cast pair veterans like Lee and Honor Blackman with then stars-on-the-rise like Jack Davenport and a young Gerard Butler but the quirky, sarcastic characters fail to engage. Jason Scott Lee plays an oddly uptight hero and while Louise Lombard is initially set up as a feisty, resourceful heroine she ends up at best a bog standard damsel in distress or at worst a red herring. Meanwhile Sean Pertwee runs through another of his patented “blimey, I'm off me trolley!” routines he continued in films like this and Dog Soldiers (2002) following the ghastly Event Horizon (1997). Late in the game the film wheels on Shelley Duvall as a bizarre psychic medium (“I sense a great deal of negative energy”) whose shrill, pointless presence proves a complete waste of screen time. Interestingly, horror fans may not several motifs familiar from the gothic zombie films of Lucio Fulci, e.g. City of the Living Dead (1980), The Beyond (1981) and The House by the Cemetery (1981): a blind man with a guide dog who come to a sorry end, a psychic medium paired with a skeptic and a crazed visionary, a monster that survives harvesting the organs of others, a band of less than formidable heroes that gradually realize they alone can save the world. Talos the Mummy shares the same disjointed narrative of Fulci's movies but is not as lively.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 2943 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Russell Mulcahy  (1953 - )

Australian director with a flashy visual style. A former music video director - most notably for Duran Duran - Mulcahy made an impact in 1984 with his first real film, the Outback creature feature Razorback. 1986's fantasy thriller Highlander was a big cult hit, and its success led to a foray in Hollywood in the 1990s, which included thrillers Ricochet and The Real McCoy, the superhero yarn The Shadow and the sequel Highlander II: The Quickening. Subsequent work has largely been in TV.

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: