HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
Diana's Wedding
Deerskin
Toll, The
Two of Us
Nowhere Special
Rainbow Jacket, The
Crazy Samurai: 400 vs 1
First Cow
Undiscovered Tomb
Being Frank
Occupation: Rainfall
Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  Jack and Diane Passionate Friends
Year: 2012
Director: Bradley Rust Gray
Stars: Juno Temple, Riley Keough, Cara Seymour, Kylie Minogue, Dane DeHaan, Michael Chernus, Neal Huff, Haviland Morris, Lou Taylor Pucci, Jen Ponton
Genre: Romance, WeirdoBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Diane (Juno Temple) is a little lost. She's looking for her sister who ought to be able to tell her where she is meant to be going, that is to her aunt's apartment in Brooklyn since they have both just arrived in the country from their native England, but Diane has lost her phone and nobody she talks to on the street is willing to offer her a free call to contact someone who knows where she is supposed to be. Eventually after a lot of fruitless wandering around, she enters a shop and asks to use the phone, but the owner behind the counter is less than accomodating - then suddenly someone emerges from the back room of the premises and Diane is immediately intrigued.

That someone is Jack, who unlike the John Mellancamp song this was somewhat bafflingly named after was not a boy growing up in the American heartland but a teenage lesbian, who happened to be played by Riley Keough, granddaughter of the King of Rock 'n' Roll, Elvis Presley in one of her first major acting roles. Funnily enough, this was not what the interest generated by the movie orbited around, as the most anticipation was down to watching a horror movie about gay teen girl werewolves, which was likely why it went down so badly with so many people. Far from being a traditional chiller, Jack and Diane was a tentative love story with weirdo asides, from animated inserts courtesy of cult filmmakers The Brothers Quay.

Their contribution may not have amounted to much screen time but it did add to the sense of something scary and primal rumbling under the drama as we watched dark braids slither over unidentifiable organs and innards, presumably a representation of what the two lead characters were feeling as they fumbled towards a romance. In the same manner, the werewolf parts were relegated to representational dream sequences, and none too many of them at that, with only three or so brief scenes depicting someone in a hairy, rubber suit attacking the girls, whereupon we're made aware that this is not actually happening and it's the turmoil of their vivid imaginations carrying them away. That said, the nosebleeds the emotions start in them did seem to be indicating more than actually played out.

In a horror movie approach, at any rate, so if this was not the gore-drenched supernatural thriller that so many wanted and did not get, what on earth was it? More of a muted relationship drama with woozy, dreamlike techniques, that's what, probably more satisfying to those who wished to see something out of the ordinary and not sticking to conventions, be they in the form of horror or even in the form of gay love yarns. Obviously writer and director Bradley Rust Gray was not even glancing towards the mainstream with Jack and Diane, yet for those with a taste for the... not quirky exactly, that adjective would sell the production short, but the outré perhaps, there was much to appreciate, not least in the sensitive and pointedly contrasting performances from Temple and Keough, though a publicity-courting appearance from Kylie Minogue may disappoint her fans.

Jack is well aware she is a lesbian and wastes no time in seducing the lost Diane in the nightclub she takes her to instead of escorting her to the home of Diane's Aunt Linda (Cara Seymour) where she is supposed to be, but that was not to say she was taking advantage of the British girl, as she (and we) can tell there's a mutual interest. One snog later, and they have clicked, though the sadness is that this is not a love to last, not a holiday fling because they really do connect, it's just that circumstances are never going to match them up even if they do keep in touch: in a matter of days, Diane has to leave for fashion school in Paris, France. This leads Jack to try and reject her to prevent any damage to her fragile soul (she tries to play it tough, but she's actually quite vulnerable), but Diane has gotten under her skin (is that what the Quay animations are?) and a series of seemingly inconsequential but sweetly portrayed encounters meander across the screen as a result, some more offbeat than others. This may not have been what most expected, but that was no reason to dismiss its charms.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1898 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: