HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
12 Hour Shift
Filmmaker's House, The
Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud, The
Spoilers, The
Killer Therapy
Man Upstairs, The
Bloodhound, The
New Mutants, The
Tesla
Flame of New Orleans, The
Ham on Rye
Imperial Blue
Tenet
August 32nd on Earth
Don is Dead, The
Seven Sinners
Body of Water
Away
Soul
About Endlessness
Let It Snow
Ava
Deliver Us from Evil
Shark Attack 3: Megalodon
Midnight Sky, The
Lego Star Wars Holiday Special, The
Mon Oncle Antoine
Blast of Silence
Blackout, The
Stars in Your Eyes
Alone
Climate of the Hunter
Farewell Amor
Let's Scare Julie
Okko's Inn
Shaolin vs. Wu Tang
Fatman
Butt Boy
Dog of Flanders, The
Bushido Blade, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
Blood Wedding: The Bride with White Hair on Blu-ray
The Inhuman Element: The Ladykillers on 4K UHD
As You Like It, Baby: Breathless on Blu-ray
Stargazing: Light Entertainment Rarities on DVD
Down to the Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 2 on DVD
Herding Cats: Sleepwalkers on Blu-ray
Confessions of a Porn Star: Adult Material on DVD
They're Still Not Sure It is a Baby: Eraserhead on Blu-ray
Werewolves are Real: Dog Soldiers on Digital
   
 
  4:44 Last Day on Earth Counting The Hours
Year: 2011
Director: Abel Ferrara
Stars: Willem Dafoe, Shanyn Leigh, Natasha Lyonne, Anita Pallenberg, Dierdra McDowell, Paul Hipp, Paz de la Huerta, Trung Nguyen, Triana Jackson, Pat Kiernan, José Solano, Francis Kuipers
Genre: Drama, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Not long to go until the end of life on Earth as we know it, and it was all because we failed to heed the warnings of the scientists and environmental commentators who told us in no uncertain terms that if we continued behaving the way we did we would destroy the planet's ecosystem, thus spelling our extinction. And so that has come to pass, and in a few short hours the ozone layer will burn off, then the atmosphere will turn toxic, killing everyone and everything that is alive. With nobody quite sure how to react, the globe's population curiously, even numbly, go about their lives much as they always have...

For writer Cisco (Willem Dafoe) and artist Skye (Shanyn Leigh), a romantically involved couple, that means he continues to write and she continues to paint, only breaking off to make love and call up people on the internet video phone service which seemed to be getting a hefty dose of advertising by dint of its inclusion in director Abel Ferrara's end of the world scenario. For a lot of the running time 4:44 was a two-hander, or at least it would seem that way until you noticed they both spent a lot of time on this internet service chatting to those they could not be with at the finale, for whatever reason.

And then after an argument Cisco leaves to wander the streets, so the couple aren't even together for a stretch of what was a very short feature (around an hour and a quarter if you didbn't count the end credits), and a lot of that, some would say that bit too much, was taken up with stock footage edited into the action. Be it a poetic scene of nature, some street in crisis somewhere, or a dollop of an archived interview with the likes of Al Gore or the Dalai Lama, for a supposedly dramatic work this didn't half look like a collage of found footage interspersed with Dafoe and Leigh breaking up and getting back together again, then having sex with each other to keep the audience interested.

In spite of a sequence where Cisco witnesses a neighbour stepping off a fire escape to his suicide there was not an abundance of drama here, no matter the subject which you would think would be the biggest cataclysm in history but here is oddly shrugged off. It's not as if they were wrong about what was happening, but the budget was too low for a special effects bonanza so what you got was yet another montage sleepily playing out over images of the two leads looking contemplative. It was almost as if Ferrara had a forty minute movie but was forced by finances to expand it to a feature and the only way he could find to do so was to bulk it out with whatever he found to hand.

Not forgetting favours from a small selection of celebrity pals, so Anita Pallenberg showed up on a laptop to ramble about smoking to her screen daughter Leigh when you might have thought bidding each other farewell, tearfully or otherwise, could have been a more appropriate use of their their time. Natasha Lyonne was at a gathering Cisco winds up at, and Paz de la Huerta kept her clothes on as a passerby in the street, but more or less it was Dafoe and Leigh we were intended to concentrate on, which was tricky when the overall message appeared to be that if the end does arrive, there will be no proper response, and the futility of doing anything will quash any ideas of significance since there is no posterity to leave anything to. The tragedy of the younger characters seeing their potential snuffed out wasn't highlighted to any great extent, which left you watching Dafoe chuntering away to himself to no purpose, with only oblique references to religion to suggest this might lead somewhere. But it probably won't. Music by Francis Kuipers (who also appears).
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2477 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Abel Ferrara  (1952 - )

Controversial New York director whose films frequently centre around sex, violence and moral redemption, and often feature Harvey Keitel, Christopher Walken or Willem Dafoe. Debuted in 1979 with the infamous Driller Killer, in which he also starred, followed by rape-revenge thriller Ms. 45/Angel of Vengeance. Several slick, less distinctive movies followed - Fear City, China Girl and Cat Chaser, as well as work on TV shows Miami Vice and Crime Story.

1990's King of New York was a return to form, while the searing Bad Lieutenant quickly became the most notorious, and perhaps best, film of Ferrara's career. The nineties proved to be the director's busiest decade, as he dabbled in intense psycho-drama (Dangerous Game, The Blackout), gangster movies (The Funeral), sci-fi (Body Snatchers, New Rose Hotel) and horror (The Addiction). He continued to turn in little-seen but interesting work, such as the urban drug drama 'R Xmas and the religious allegory Mary until his higher profile returned with the likes of Welcome to New York and Pasolini.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
Paul Smith
  Lee Fiveash
   

 

Last Updated: