HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Selma
Great Locomotive Chase, The
American Anthem
Lion and the Horse, The
Druids
War of the Wizards
Onward
Doctor Faustus
Spite Marriage
Mask, The
Letter to Jane
Quick Millions
Dream Demon
Max Havelaar
Radioactive
Glastonbury Fayre
All Dogs Go to Heaven
Shoot Out
Da 5 Bloods
Sonatine
Kung Fu Monster
Secret Agent Super Dragon
Saint Frances
Boiling Point
Golden Stallion, The
Dragon Force
Anthropocene: The Human Epoch
Luck of Ginger Coffey, The
Junkers Come Here
Ladius
White, White Day, A
Strong Medicine
Bitter Springs
Centipede Horror
Physical Evidence
Fanny Lye Deliver'd
55 Days at Peking
Alive
Man from Snowy River, The
Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo
   
 
Newest Articles
Bat-Damn: Was Joel Schumacher's Batman Really That Bad?
The Beat Goes On: Takeshi Kitano Collection on Blu-ray
Dream Treats: Scorsese Shorts on Blu-ray
It's Only Money: Laughter in Paradise on Blu-ray
A Regular Terpsichore: Dance, Girl, Dance on Blu-ray
Teenage Trauma: Baby Love on Blu-ray
The Happening: Pet Shop Boys It Couldn't Happen Here on Blu-ray
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
   
 
  Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man Who Were Those Guys?
Year: 1991
Director: Simon Wincer
Stars: Mickey Rourke, Don Johnson, Chelsea Field, Daniel Baldwin, Giancarlo Esposito, Vanessa Williams, Robert Ginty, Tia Carrere, Julius Harris, Eloy Casados, Big John Studd, Tom Sizemore, Mitzi Martin, Kelly Hu, James Nardini, Sven Ole-Thorsen
Genre: Action, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: A man known only as Harley Davidson (Mickey Rourke) rides through the futuristic America of 1996, not one to be tied down to any one place or person, though he has a yearning to return to an old bar he used to frequent in Los Angeles. Pausing briefly to stop a gas station hold-up out in the desert and liberating one of the soundly beaten criminals' guns, he opts to seek it out, as meanwhile his old friend The Marlboro Man (Don Johnson) is trying to win a bet at pool, something he is all too accomplished at much to the chagrin of his opponent, though if there's one thing both mates are good at it's taking care of themselves...

This was one of the worst reviewed movies of all time, as if a whole decade of cheerfully, and many times all-too-sincerely, brainless action flicks had brought the world to the final straw and people just weren't going to take this bullshit any longer. So it was to nobody's surprise that the film flopped, with both of the leading men making no secret of the fact they considered it a career dead end and regretting ever having signed on for it, and yet there was a small contingent of buffs who regarded it as perhaps not classic material, but nothing like as bad as most people had made out: why make this the whipping boy?

Well, for a start if you had a choice between watching this and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid you would be wiser to choose the earlier film, as for some reason screenwriter Don Michael Paul thought that was ideal for a science fiction remake, though not so much that the characters were firing off laser guns or flying hovercycles. The Western favourite had Paul Newman and Robert Redford, and there can't have been many who believed their replacements here were of equal star wattage, with Rourke already committing career suicide and considered at best a squanderer of his talent, and Johnson too indelibly connected to television to have most audiences accept him on the silver screen.

Butch and Sundance had Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head, this had Bon Jovi singing about the steel horse they ride, and exactly how would that work, then? Surely a steel horse wouldn't move very far? Unless they were talking about some kind of funfair ride, or maybe one of those rides for little kids outside supermarkets? ANYWAY. When this opens with a disclaimer that nobody received any product placement dollars for that title, it did have you wondering why they didn't just call the movie Harvey Donaldson and the Musselburgh Man or something more reminiscent of counterfeit goods which would be more appropriate seeing as how this was the downmarket brand version of the 1969 classic.

That bar Harley and Marley, er, Marlboro are so fond of is about to be closed down, so they decide to help out their old friends by raising some cash for them. Or rather, they plot to rob an armoured car (instead of a train) which they manage to succeed in except their spoils turn out to be lots of those made up drugs beloved of sci-fi of this era, leaving them with the problem of how to change that for money, especially as our heroes are not drugs dealers. Complicating matters are a group of heavies clad in bulletproof anoraks who for some reason don't think to use the same material for gloves and hats, although for some other reason the good guys don't think about aiming for their heads until the last shootout. These henchmen are working for a Japanese-speaking Tom Sizemore, a head honcho of some corporate villainy, who the dynamic duo must overcome to get around to a quiet life. For all the brickbats this received, it was purely undemanding, though not all that good in that vein, but you could see why it would fit the bill as easy to watch. Music by Basil Poledouris.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2003 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Simon Wincer  (1943 - )

Australian director who began working in TV in his homeland. Directed the horror flick Snapshot, before heading to Hollywood scoring a hit with the sci-fi adventure D.A.R.Y.L. Wincer had success on the small screen with the award-winning western Lonesome Dove and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, and on the big screen directed the likes of Free Willy, Quigley Down Under and The Phantom.

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
  Hannah Prosser
   

 

Last Updated: