HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Herself
Mon Oncle d'Amerique
Wild Strawberries
Runner, The
Don't Look Up
Ghostbusters: Afterlife
Eternals
Forever Purge, The
Memoria
Venom: Let There Be Carnage
Legend of La Llorona, The
Japon
Glasshouse
Perdita Durango
Commando, The
Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror
Boiling Point
Malignant
Deadly Games
Ailey
Voyeurs, The
Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes
In the Earth
Hiroshima Mon Amour
Hotel Poseidon
Zola
No Time to Die
Klaus
Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey
Candyman
Power of the Dog, The
StageFright
Voyage of Time: An IMAX Documentary
Suicide Squad, The
One Night in Miami...
Old
Prince of Nothingwood, The
Gagarine
Mr. Jones
Enfants Terribles, Les
   
 
Newest Articles
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
Vestron Double Bill: Dementia 13 and The Wraith
Farewell Dean Stockwell: His Years of Weirdness
Kung Fu Craft: Cinematic Vengeance! on Blu-ray
999 Letsbe Avenue: Gideon's Way on Blu-ray
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
   
 
  Interlude Pure As The Driven Slush
Year: 1968
Director: Kevin Billington
Stars: Oskar Werner, Barbara Ferris, Virginia Maskell, Donald Sutherland, Nora Swinbourne, Alan Webb, Bernard Kaye, Geraldine Sherman, Gino Melvazzi, Muguette de Braie, Robert Lang, Roslyn DeWinter, Janet Davies, John Cleese, Richard Pescud, Derek Jacobi
Genre: RomanceBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Stefan Zelter (Oskar Werner) meets with his former lover Sally (Barbara Ferris) at her old apartment in London, having encountered each other by chance that evening. What else is there to be said? Nothing except reminisce over their affair and how it was never going to work out when Stefan was a married father of two and his wife Antonia (Virginia Maskell) would never divorce him. The two of them had met when he was carrying out his duties as a temperamental orchestra conductor in Britain, and journalist Sally had been sent by her editor to do a story on him...

This was a tale filmed twice before, once as a Douglas Sirk effort, but here as the directorial debut of respected television documentarian Kevin Billington, though the object in all three versions was the same: to get the audience weeping buckets. Quite how successful each of these were is a matter for debate, but of the trio of this romance's incarnations, the 1968 Interlude was notable for generating the most fervent fanbase, and there were a few reasons for that, one of them being the presence of a certain Austrian leading man who was giving film stardom another go after a couple of Fran├žois Truffaut successes.

Those two French films had made Werner internationally recognisable; he had been a fairly well-known actor before, but only patchily, though as a boyish handsome blond he had made an impression on some female moviegoers, as well as those who liked to visit the theatre. Yet by the point he made this, he may have still been popular but a reputation for heavy drinking and being difficult to work with meant that he only made two more films (oh, and an episode of Columbo) before sticking with the stage to a dwindling reaction. Here he was the Oskar his fans wanted to know: romantic, moody, brilliant and artistic.

His co-star never went onto anything like the same degree of cult adulation in spite of being in the right place at the right time for a few sixties movies; for Ferris, this was probably her best recalled role unless you were a Dave Clark Five fan (she starred in their movie). Rather overshadowing her in terms of renown was Maskell, for whom this would be her last film as she committed suicide before it was released. In her role as the third part of the love triangle she put across a great sense of suffering in silence, or at least tolerance, so you could read into that what you wanted in terms of the actress's turmoil. It was true enough that every main character here went through their own private hell sooner or later.

And all for love, which would have just as many swooning as it would others rolling their eyes and complaining Interlude was not so much sensitive melodrama as it was a headlong dive into the depths of despair to wallow in for a couple of hours. Plotwise, there wasn't much to it, basically we see an extended flashback of Stefan and Sally meeting at a recording studio (where TV assistant John Cleese attempts to chat Sally up in an amusing minor role, an early one for him - he wasn't even in Monty Python at the time). Before long they are canoodling and not thinking about the consequences much further than a few hours ahead, a running theme on how an affair sends out repercussions, rendering it an essentially selfish act shared between two people. This is captivating enough for the first three quarters, with well-observed performances and enough light and shade, yet come the last act when the floodgates are to open it was morose and calculated to an extent hard to take unless you'd fallen for the lovers yourself. Music by Georges Delerue, with lots of nicely-chosen classical extracts.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4484 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: