HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Back to the Beach Surfs You Right
Year: 1987
Director: Lyndall Hobbs
Stars: Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello, Lori Loughlin, Tommy Hinkley, Demian Slade, Connie Stevens, Joe Holland, Joe Calvin, David Bowe, Laura Urstein, Linda Carol, Dick Dale, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Don Adams, Edd Byrnes, Bob Denver, Alan Hale Jr, Paul Reubens
Genre: Musical, ComedyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Way back in the sixties Frankie (Frankie Avalon) was known as The Big Kahuna, the greatest surfer in California, but time passed and for his own reasons he retired from the ocean and became a car salesman in Ohio, settling down with the beach bunny of his dreams Annette (Annette Funicello) to raise two kids in suburban bliss. Now it is over twenty years later, and their son Bobby (Demian Slade) looks upon his parents with disdain while their daughter Sandi (Lori Loughlin) now lives at the beach over in California. Perhaps it's time for Frankie and Annette to return?

Technically this was the last in the cycle of A.I.P.'s Beach Party movies, though in another way it wasn't really, because it wasn't made by the original studio and of those regulars who appeared with Frankie and Annette, none returned, not even for cameos. So if you were a big fan of the series - and there were a few, mostly nostalgists, granted - then you might be let down by the lack of the old faces. On the other hand, enough time has passed to render Back to the Beach as a double dose of fond memories, because it was to the eighties what those originals had been to the sixties, product placement, big hair and all.

Fair enough, the guest stars were of the calibre of Don Adams (of Get Smart) and Bob Denver (of Gilligan's Island) when to get into the spirit of the cult classics (?) they really should have asked Jerry Lewis and Robert Englund to show up for cameos, but there were also appearances by eighties celebrities such as Stevie Ray Vaughan (duetting with Dick Dale on a single track) and Pee-Wee Herman mystifyingly carried in on a surfboard when he really wouldn't have been allowed within fifty miles of one, nor would he in all conscience wish to be. When you hear his version of Surfin' Bird you might be tempted to ask him to be taken away again. But really this was Frankie and Annette's show all the way.

Bizarrely, because of rights issues Avalon wasn't allowed to be called Frankie (his actual name!) as this was an unofficial entry in the Beach Party franchise, though Annette was still called Annette (hooray for lawyers!), so he ended up being referred to by Cliff Robertson's moniker from the original beach movie Gidget, or variations thereof, the best being The Big Crapola. Some things were reassuringly the same, however, as you could rely on their being a great big argument between the two leads at one point in the story, resulting in enough misunderstandings to fuel the narrative for a whole ninety minutes or so. In this case, they fall out once they reach California to find Sandi is living in sin.

That's right, they called their daughter Sandi - why wasn't Bobby called something like Wavey? Anyway, all too aware of what audiences would want to see, there were plenty of callbacks to the sources, though Harvey Lembeck's bikers were replaced by what looked like the cast of an Italian post-apocalypse entry, who Bobby proceeds to join in juvenile delinquent style, flick-comb and all. Meanwhile, it turns out Sandi is dating Mike (Tommy Hinkley), the son of Frankie's old flame Connie Stevens, complete with incest gags which are swiftly nipped in the bud, though Annette still has reason to be jealous and sets about making her husband feel the same. This was a musical, as before, but the old tunes were bastardised and the new ones undistinguished, though nice to see the stars tackling them with enthusiasm - you realised Avalon and Funicello had real chemistry together. Sadly, her illness prevented any more feature films, but as a goodnatured appeal to the nostalgics, Back to the Beach did entertain.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5100 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: