HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Tokyo Dragon Chef
Pittsburgh
12 Hour Shift
Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud, The
Spoilers, The
Killer Therapy
Man Upstairs, The
Bloodhound, The
New Mutants, The
Tesla
Flame of New Orleans, The
Ham on Rye
Imperial Blue
Tenet
August 32nd on Earth
Don is Dead, The
Seven Sinners
Body of Water
Away
Soul
About Endlessness
Let It Snow
Ava
Deliver Us from Evil
Shark Attack 3: Megalodon
Midnight Sky, The
Lego Star Wars Holiday Special, The
Mon Oncle Antoine
Blast of Silence
Blackout, The
Stars in Your Eyes
Alone
Climate of the Hunter
Farewell Amor
Let's Scare Julie
Okko's Inn
Shaolin vs. Wu Tang
Fatman
Butt Boy
Dog of Flanders, The
   
 
Newest Articles
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
Blood Wedding: The Bride with White Hair on Blu-ray
The Inhuman Element: The Ladykillers on 4K UHD
As You Like It, Baby: Breathless on Blu-ray
Stargazing: Light Entertainment Rarities on DVD
Down to the Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 2 on DVD
Herding Cats: Sleepwalkers on Blu-ray
Confessions of a Porn Star: Adult Material on DVD
They're Still Not Sure It is a Baby: Eraserhead on Blu-ray
   
 
  Till Death Us Do Part Her Bitter 'Alf
Year: 1968
Director: Norman Cohen
Stars: Warren Mitchell, Dandy Nichols, Anthony Booth, Una Stubbs, Liam Redmond, Bill Maynard, Brian Blessed, Sam Kydd, Frank Thornton, Ann Lancaster, Michael Robbins, Pat Coombs, Kate Williams, Shelagh Fraser, John D. Collins, Geoffrey Hughes, Tommy Godfrey
Genre: ComedyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Alf Garnett (Warren Mitchell) was born a Londoner, and if he has his way he'll die a Londoner, nobody can change that, not even the advent of World War II. Alf is an unashamed bigot and generally wrong about pretty much everything, including in 1939 when he refused to believe Great Britain would go into battle, especially with a strong leader like Neville Chamberlain (in Alf's mind), but he was soon proved incorrect, as would be the case throughout his life. For all his rhetoric about how proud he was to be British, he wasn't even prepared to fight for his country...

Writer Johnny Speight began his groundbreaking sitcom Till Death Us Do Part, of which this was the movie version, as a way of laying out various issues facing Britain in the sixties, issues which other comedies of the day were reluctant to confront. By placing the prejudice of his Garnett character right out there, he was able to come up with a dialogue between right and left in the form of Alf's older generation heatedly discussing politics and society which were hot button topics with the more enlightened younger generation, represented by his daughter Rita (Una Stubbs) and her boyfriend Mike (Anthony Booth) who would adopt Speight's less conservative point of view.

Also appearing was Dandy Nichols as Elsie, Alf's longsuffering wife who may have seemed meek but was able to come up with the odd pithy retort to her husband's diatribes. All four of these stars returned to these roles for this film, though the series itself would continue into the seventies to diminishing returns for many in the audience, as if Speight's work was done and he was repeating himself by the end of the programme's run. That didn't stop him reviving it for the eighties sitcom In Sickness and In Health and some Garnett specials, but by that stage he was talking to the older generation almost exclusively, and his most famous creation was looking less ironically received than was intended, but then there were always those who took him at face value.

Which brought us to the largely forgotten movie; there were two in fact, but this first was regarded as the better. Much of what made the television incarnation popular was the shock value, hearing people say the sort of thing they'd only let out in their least guarded moments, so Speight and his director Norman Cohen were plainly trying to sustain that, though in practice this meant a curious emphasis on toilets, which you wouldn't have got on the small screen of the day. So Alf often sits in his outside loo in conversation with the neighbour who is doing the same in his lavatory next door, a moment of reflection for them both as valuable as the pub at the corner of their terraced street (Mitchell also demonstrates the correct way to eat a sausage in a working class acting manner). All this as the world passes him by, progressing while Alf stays the same.

The value of being static while life goes on is as much the theme here as it was railing against the loosening constraints of society, with a two part sequence of episodes in his existence, the first made up of the war years and the second a jump forward twenty years to then-recent history. In spite of featuring only half the regular cast, the earlier section was the better perhaps because it operated as an origin tale and was something different to the seemingly endless yelling matches which the TV incarnation tended to be comprised of. Although it's never clear how cowardly blowhard Alf manages to get out of his conscription into the British Army, it's a useful device to effectively undercut everything he says for the rest of the film, though by the point Rita and Mike are on the scene it can grow wearisome when you know more top of their voice exchanges are on their way. With an interlude for the World Cup 1966 victory bringing Alf temporarily together with his fellow man and urban renewal looming, he was a man out of time, though far from alone. Music by Wilfred Burns, with a Kinks theme song.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1886 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
Paul Smith
  Lee Fiveash
   

 

Last Updated: