HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Stylist, The
Sky is On Fire, The
Wrong Turn
In a Year with 13 Moons
Blush
Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, The
Sinners, The
Tammy and the T-Rex
Archenemy
Zappa
Mindwarp
State Secret
Mogul Mowgli
Owners, The
Twentieth Century, The
Story of Gilbert and Sullivan, The
What Lies Below
Greenland
Broil
Dead Pigs
Willy's Wonderland
It's in the Air
School's Out Forever
Breeder
Stump the Guesser
Sator
Last Warning, The
PVT CHAT
Ascent, The
Clementine
Hurt by Paradise
Saint Maud
Johnny Frenchman
Glitch in the Matrix, A
Beginning
Meeting the Man: James Baldwin in Paris
Funeral Home, The
Sailors Three
Bill & Ted Face the Music
Josep
   
 
Newest Articles
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
   
 
  Naked Face, The Think Shrink
Year: 1984
Director: Bryan Forbes
Stars: Roger Moore, Rod Steiger, Elliott Gould, Art Carney, Anne Archer, David Hedison, Deanna Dunagan, Ron Parady, Dick Sollenberger, James Spinks, John Kapelos, Cynthia Baker Schuyler, Virginia Smith, Joe D. Lauck, Jimmie F. Skaggs, Mary Demas
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  3 (from 1 vote)
Review: Dr Judd Stevens (Roger Moore) is a psychiatrist for some of the top patients of New York, as well as assisting on criminal cases when required. Yesterday he visited the grave of his late wife to lay flowers there, unaware that as he did so, someone was aiming a rifle at him and he escaped being shot by the skin of his teeth. Today he has gone to his office and heard a few patients attending his therapy sessions, including Ann Blake (Anne Archer) who is very cagey about her specific issues, which Stevens suspects is down to her husband. But when one of his patients is murdered...

And not only murdered, but done in wearing the doctor's anorak which he had lent him because it was raining, which might give one thoughts that this was a case of mistaken identity, unless you were investigating officer Rod Steiger, that was. He played Lieutenant McGeary, who has a grudge against Stevens after the shrink managed to get the murderer of his cop partner on what he saw as a lighter insanity conviction, therefore apparently he's so professional that McGeary needs to arrest the psychiatrist just to get his own back on the namby pamby mental health industry. If this sounds like you should be settling down for so bad it's good fun, however, think again.

For the most part, The Naked Face was extremely boring, so although the opening twenty minutes indicate director Bryan Forbes, here with his final cinema movie, was turning into quite the Michael Winner type thanks to the producers of this effort being Cannon, a studio not best known for their subtlety and refined taste, the way the rest of it played out was leadfooted and humdrum, this in spite of a bunch of people getting threatened and even killed in the process of the plot. During that opening, we don't only see Steiger behaving offensively towards homosexuals and psychiatrists, but Stevens' secretary lying naked and dead in his ransacked office, which the lieutenant claims the doc did himself.

If you were not worn down by the grinding tedium that somehow erupted after such a promisingly trashy start, there were minor points of interest. One was Sir Rog attempting to break away from his James Bond persona by playing a far less capable character, which was certainly within his range yet watching him essaying the lead in a Sidney Sheldon adaptation was not exactly the biggest stretch he could have brought us. Nevertheless, there was a slight novelty in that Stevens runs away and gets beaten up in a very non-Bond manner, and doesn't get to romance anyone, not even Ann Blake who hovers in the background in a manner that suggests she has more to do with the attempts on her therapist's life than she's letting on.

In fact, there's one reason The Naked Face is recalled, if at all, and it's not to do with any nakedness, facial or otherwise. It's the last few seconds of the movie, which sticks with everyone who sees it, either because they think it's a shocking way to end the proceedings, or more likely because it's hilarious, especially after how grim and serious the rest of the plot has been. It was in no way supposed to be funny, but something about its abruptness and the immortal line "Bastards!" barked by a narked Rog triggered a lot of laughter in those who happened to catch it on late night television or wherever - you can't imagine many watched it in the cinema - and embedded it in the minds of the select few who braved its yawnsome plodding. Or happened to see its last couple of minutes before the programme they wanted to watch was broadcast. The explanation for all this kerfuffle was not especially interesting after all that build up, more suited to an in one ear and out the other TV movie - ah, but that ending! Music by Michael J. Lewis.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1596 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
   

 

Last Updated: