HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
Burning Sea, The
Godzilla Singular Point
Ace of Aces
Innocents, The
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Count Dracula Broker With Stoker
Year: 1970
Director: Jess Franco
Stars: Christopher Lee, Herbert Lom, Klaus Kinski, Soledad Miranda, Maria Rohm, Fred Williams, Paul Muller, Jack Taylor, Jesús Puente, José Martínez Blanco, Franco Castellani
Genre: HorrorBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Lawyer Jonathan Harker (Fred Williams) arrives in Eastern Europe seeking to assist a local nobleman, one Count Dracula (Christopher Lee), with finding a property in London as he is planning to move abroad. But when he mentions where he is heading to a fellow traveller, the reaction he receives is troubling, and that continues when he reaches the inn near Dracula's castle: the innkeeper treats him as if he were a doomed soul, and his wife stops Harker on the stairs that night to tell him that as tonight is St. George's night, he would be deeply unwise to head off to that place...

We know very well why that is, but the locals are oddly reluctant to offer any more advice, possibly because they want rid of the Count from their neighbourhood pronto, though that doesn't quite explain why they're on the brink of warning Harker away from the territory once and for all. But this was a Jess Franco film, and you had to expect some degree of illogicality even if producer Harry Alan Towers made the claim this verson was the most faithful to Bram Stoker's original to date (it's not as if many were going to check in 1970 whether this was indeed the case). For a while, it looked as if Towers had a point, but then the stuffed animals arrived.

Actually before that there were deviations from the text, but there was a lot here which represented a conscious attempt to stick to the classic horror novel, it was just that the money to make a lavishly mounted version as it really needed was lacking. This left a sparse appearance, poor special effects and a strange, remote atmosphere which lacked the full-blooded passion such a tale required, but for Franco fans demonstrated his own particular way with a chiller yarn. Meaning his roving camera was to the fore, zooming into faces, panning across rooms, getting distracted by something halfway through a scene, and generally doing little to hide the lack of budget which seemed mostly to have gone on securing the cast.

Lee famously said he was only interested in returning to the role which made him famous if it was entirely drawn from Stoker, but the results were not really much better than the Hammer he made around the same time, Scars of Dracula, if in a more Continental style. Certainly it was a coup to get his services in the middle of Hammer outings in this part, but in effect it couldn't avoid the way that in the novel, the Count doesn't actually have the starring role in spite of being the character the rest are talking about from page one to the grand finale. Other places where Franco and Towers got it right were in the talent they found for Renfield, the insect-eating maniac who has a connection with the vampire, and Van Helsing, the elderly professor who knows all too well the way to scupper the Count's plans.

Klaus Kinski was Renfield, and by some accounts was so into his character that he actually ate flies on camera, and that is the way it appeared: you couldn't have asked for a better fit, even though he never speaks a word so Stoker's great dialogue for the lunatic was missing. As for Van Helsing, Herbert Lom did well to offer the production much-needed dignity when Lee, with whom he never shared a scene, was not onscreen, and if Maria Rohm, wife of Towers, and Soledad Miranda, then-partner of Franco (although soon to be tragically killed), were not too surprising additions to the cast as Mina and Lucy respectively, they did loosely look the part despite being underused, and perhaps miscast anyway. If you were a stickler for detail, then this might prove frustrating when it gets so close to the original then either cannot present itself with the necessary aplomb, or goes off the rails when Franco opted for his own "improvements". It had that atmosphere peculiar to his productions, but was a rather anaemic in effect. Music by Bruno Nicolai, heavy on the zither.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3410 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Jess Franco  (1930 - 2013)

Legendary director of predominantly sex-and-horror-based material, Spanish-born Jesus Franco had as many as 200 directing credits to his name. Trained initially as a musician before studying film at the Sorbonne in Paris, Franco began directing in the late 50s. By using the same actors, sets and locations on many films, Franco has maintained an astonishing workrate, and while the quality of his work has sometimes suffered because of this, films such as Virgin Amongst the Living dead, Eugenie, Succubus and She Killed in Ecstasy remain distinctive slices of 60s/70s art-trash.

Most of his films have been released in multiple versions with wildly differing titles, while Franco himself has directed under a bewildering number of pseudonyms. Actors who have regularly appeared in his films include Klaus Kinski, Christopher Lee and wife Lina Romay; fans should also look out for his name on the credits of Orson Welles' Chimes of Midnight, on which he worked as assistant director.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: