HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Portal
Me You Madness
Reckoning, The
Laddie: The Man Behind the Movies
For the Sake of Vicious
Hell Bent
Straight Shooting
Jules Verne's Rocket to the Moon
Man They Could Not Hang, The
Final Days
Frightened City, The
Assimilate
Sequin in a Blue Room
Common Crime, A
Into the Labyrinth
Power, The
Wake of Death
Night Orchid
Mortal
Iron Mask, The
Dinosaur
Personal History of David Copperfield, The
Dove, The
Collective
Charulata
Minari
Violation
Defending Your Life
Champagne Murders, The
He Dreams of Giants
Lost in America
Take Back
Honeydew
Banishing, The
Drifters, The
Gushing Prayer
Escape from Coral Cove
Swan Princess, The
Shortcut
Stray
   
 
Newest Articles
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
   
 
  Jurassic Park Sixty-Five Million Years Later...
Year: 1993
Director: Steven Spielberg
Stars: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, Joseph Mazzello, Ariana Richards, Samuel L. Jackson, BD Wong, Wayne Knight, Gerald R. Molen, Miguel Sandoval, Cameron Thor, Richard Kiley
Genre: Horror, Science Fiction, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  8 (from 2 votes)
Review: On an island one hundred and twenty miles off the coast of Costa Rica, there is a new project being completed, but quite how safe it is will be another matter as one of the workers has already been killed. Not that the world at large is aware of that, and the director of the business involved, John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), has kept it quiet for his own financial reasons; he's not about to tell paleontologists Dr Alan Grant (Sam Neill) and his partner Dr Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) about it either. That's because he wants their opinion, or rather he wants their blessing - for Jurassic Park.

For a while until Titanic happened along, this was the most successful movie of all time, and though those figures were not adjusted for inflation nevertheless in 1993 Steven Spielberg's adaptation of Michael Crichton's bestselling novel was impossible to escape. Naturally with all this hype there was going to be a significant number of people unimpressed, and so it was when the reviews came in: oh, nice effects, the consensus was, but look at the same year's Schindler's List to see this filmmaker at his best, far more serious in subject matter and intent than a simple popcorn flick he is frittering away his talents on. But Jurassic Park was just as serious about its themes as the Holocaust movie had been.

Those themes concentrated on the then current interest in chaos theory, and how it applied to the world in general, which in its way was a tale of survival as well. Once the scientists reach the island where the naive but money-minded Hammond has developed his theme park attraction, they are curious to know what he's up to, and initially aghast at the dinosaurs he has grown in the lab from preserved DNA, yet only because they're so impressed: Stan Winston's creature effects had a similar influence over audiences. But then their regard changes to fear, as they worry what the commercially savvy businessman has gotten into without really thinking it through, thus demonstrating the central theory in terms a layman could understand: there are too many factors in play to control something as complex as nature, even nature which had become extinct.

Of course, this would be rather trying if it were some dry scientific tract, and as with Crichton's previous work Westworld, which this bore some plotting connections to (even in the Gunslinger equivalent), there were some excellent setpieces to keep the tension up, so much so that the film was criticised in many territories for being too scary for the family audiences it was aimed at. As if encouraging this, Hammond's grandchildren Tim (Joseph Mazzello) and Lex (Ariana Richards) are introduced into the mix and Richards especially had a fine line in looking terrified to really sell the suspense sequences. The first appearance of the Tyrannosaurus Rex in particular was one of the greatest instances of pure tension in Spielberg's work, giving lie to those who claimed he was operating on autopilot here.

With stretches of things going horribly wrong this could have been a souped up rejigging of the mad scientist movies of yesteryear, but took its hypothesis deadly seriously - not so stuffily that Jeff Goldblum as fellow boffin Dr Ian Malcolm couldn't offer up a few well timed quips (he's a highlight) or Dern couldn't put her flair for looking anguished into practice to underline what was at stake for the characters, but there were lessons here. Mankind is part of the chaos too, and the impossibility of taking care of every factor was utmost in the narrative, whether it be the industrial espionage agent (Wayne Knight) messing up the electronics to escape, or the famed velociraptors being far more intelligent than their creators gave them credit for. You could say the same for this film, as natural science such as evolution or reproduction (Alan is won over to the necessity of children and their care) is held up as worth preserving while simply exploiting them for oodles of cash was not. Pretty cheeky coming from a film this lucrative, but how else to get the message across as accessibly as possible? Music by John Williams.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2818 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Steven Spielberg  (1946 - )

Currently the most famous film director in the world, Spielberg got his start in TV, and directing Duel got him noticed. After The Sugarland Express, he memorably adapted Peter Benchley's novel Jaws and the blockbusters kept coming: Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Raiders of the Lost Ark and the Indiana Jones sequels, E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Jurassic Park, Minority Report, Catch Me If You Can, 2005's mega-budget remake of War of the Worlds, his Tintin adaptation, World War One drama War Horse and pop culture blizzard Ready Player One.

His best films combine thrills with a childlike sense of wonder, but when he turns this to serious films like The Color Purple, Schindler's List, Saving Private Ryan, Munich and Bridge of Spies these efforts are, perhaps, less effective than the out-and-out popcorn movies which suit him best. Of his other films, 1941 was his biggest flop, The Terminal fell between two stools of drama and comedy and one-time Kubrick project A.I. divided audiences; Hook saw him at his most juvenile - the downside of the approach that has served him so well. Also a powerful producer.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Stately Wayne Manor
   

 

Last Updated: