HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
Burning Sea, The
Godzilla Singular Point
Ace of Aces
Innocents, The
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Hollywood or Bust Road Trip
Year: 1956
Director: Frank Tashlin
Stars: Dean Martin, Jerry Lewis, Pat Crowley, Maxie Rosenbloom, Anita Ekberg
Genre: Musical, ComedyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Steve Wiley (Dean Martin) is a conman who owes a lot of money to a gangster, and a heavy, Bookie Benny (Maxie Rosenbloom) has been dispatched to get the cash or else. But when reaches Steve, he has another thing coming as the conman has worked out away to win a lot of dough by illegally getting his hands on a bunch of lottery tickets so that when the number of the car to be won comes up, he will have the right ticket and claim the vehicle, then sell it at a handsome profit. Sounds foolproof - but he reckoned without a very particular fool...

He being Malcolm Smith, played by Jerry Lewis in typical form, in this final Martin and Lewis comedy. Their rise to stardom had been stratospheric, from worldbeating nightclub double act to television shows and big hits at the cinema, but by the time this was made their friendship was well and truly soured, with neither of them wishing to so much as talk to the other except when the cameras were rolling. To their credit you wouldn't spot this offscreen antagonism in their performances, as while Martin was trying to take advantage of Lewis in the story, they were professional enough not to allow their personal lives enter into their work.

That said, by this time their fractured relationship was an open secret, with Martin complaining Lewis's ego had inflated to such mammoth proportions that he thought he was on a par with Charlie Chaplin as far as his genius for comedy went, and it's true you could discern the same mix of exacting laughs and overwhelming pathos in his stylings as the great silent comedian. In the same way that Chaplin could divide audiences later in his career, so Lewis's reputation as a resistable performer unfairly dominated his latter years, but going solo didn't harm his popularity at the time of Hollywood or Bust - if anything, it made him even more famous and it was hard to argue against his army of fans.

So if you think you'll see any sign of Martin and Lewis about to break character and end up in a fistfight, then you'd be disappointed with this nonsense, but on the other hand if you wanted to see more of director Frank Tashlin's very distinctive approach to comedy, then this might not have been the funniest film he ever made, but there were bright spots considering what he had to put up with while making it regarding his stars and their falling out. As ever, there were cartoonish sight gags and attractive women to contend with, but for much of this there was a surprising amount of simply having the characters enjoying being out on the road on the way to Hollywood.

What happens is both Steve and Malcolm win the car, or Malcolm does at any rate, and he works out a compromise: Steve will drive him to Tinseltown to meet, he hopes, Anita Ekberg (who does indeed show up, playing herself). Malcolm is what we would now call a fanboy, and believes his destiny lies in showbiz though in what capacity is none too clear, but actually for the most part the plot lived up to the ostensible tribute to the world's movie fans laid out at the beginning as it followed the duo in their roles of plain old ordinary folks. This could be seen as condescending, but Martin and Lewis still had charms so carried it off, helped by Malcolm's pet Great Dane which goes by the oft-repeated Mr Bascom (surely the most obvious name for that breed of dog until Scooby-Doo). Naturally, there was a scene where the hound was seen "driving" the car with Dean and Jerry running after it, and overall this was goodnatured stuff aside from a dodgy item of attempted rape by Steve on bright co-star Pat Crowley. Apart, Martin and Lewis sought fresh career highs, and never looked back, though their fans might have.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3342 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Frank Tashlin  (1913 - 1972)

American director whose films were heavily influenced by his years spent working in cartoons. In his 20s and 30s, Tashlin worked at both Disney and Warner Brothers in their animation studios, before moving into comedy scriptwriting in the late 1940s, on films like Bob Hope's The Paleface. Tashlin moved into directing popular live-action comedies soon after, with Hope in Son of Paleface, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis in Artists and Models and Hollywood or Bust, and most notably Jayne Mansfield in The Girl Can't Help It and Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? These films were full of inventive, sometimes surreal touches, and used many of the techniques Tashlin had learnt as an animator. Continued to work during the sixties, but without the success of the previous decade.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: