HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Tokyo Dragon Chef
Pittsburgh
12 Hour Shift
Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud, The
Spoilers, The
Killer Therapy
Man Upstairs, The
Bloodhound, The
New Mutants, The
Tesla
Flame of New Orleans, The
Ham on Rye
Imperial Blue
Tenet
August 32nd on Earth
Don is Dead, The
Seven Sinners
Body of Water
Away
Soul
About Endlessness
Let It Snow
Ava
Deliver Us from Evil
Shark Attack 3: Megalodon
Midnight Sky, The
Lego Star Wars Holiday Special, The
Mon Oncle Antoine
Blast of Silence
Blackout, The
Stars in Your Eyes
Alone
Climate of the Hunter
Farewell Amor
Let's Scare Julie
Okko's Inn
Shaolin vs. Wu Tang
Fatman
Butt Boy
Dog of Flanders, The
   
 
Newest Articles
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
Blood Wedding: The Bride with White Hair on Blu-ray
The Inhuman Element: The Ladykillers on 4K UHD
As You Like It, Baby: Breathless on Blu-ray
Stargazing: Light Entertainment Rarities on DVD
Down to the Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 2 on DVD
Herding Cats: Sleepwalkers on Blu-ray
Confessions of a Porn Star: Adult Material on DVD
They're Still Not Sure It is a Baby: Eraserhead on Blu-ray
   
 
  Road to Hong Kong Hope For Us All
Year: 1962
Director: Norman Panama
Stars: Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Joan Collins, Robert Morley, Dorothy Lamour, Walter Gotell, Felix Aylmer, Alan Gifford, Michele Mok, Katya Douglas, Roger Delgado, Robert Ayres, Mei Ling, Peter Sellers, David Niven, Jerry Colonna, Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin
Genre: Musical, Comedy, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Diane (Joan Collins) bursts into a Hong Kong governor's office and demands to see the man in charge, for she has some very important information about the mysterious spacecraft orbiting the world which the West believe to be hailing from the Soviet Union, except the radio messages they are picking up sound as if they are Americans up there. Diane has news for the authorities: it's not Russian or American, it's from a sinister organisation known as Echelon 3, and they plan to hold the world to ransom. She begins to tell all, but how does this link into two con artists central to the tale?

Those con artists being Bing Crosby and Bob Hope, under the character names Harry Turner and Chester Babcock, for this, the last hurrah of the Road series. Their previous instalment had been around ten years before with Road to Bali, which many had thought a perfectly fine way to finish, but the stars were keen to work with each other one more time, and thus seasoned comedy writers Norman Panama and Melvin Frank came up with a plot apparently designed to rival the new James Bond movie, Dr. No, which opened the same year, making this one of the quickest off the mark for a spoof genre which practically became an industry on its own in the sixties.

When British science fiction movies are mentioned, Road to Hong Kong doesn't often come up in conversation, but that's where this was made nevertheless, and it had space rockets and the like in it, so it did indeed count. To make this seem more of a lark, a raft of star cameos were included as if this were still the good old days of Bob and Bing's heyday, although a concession to the changing times was made when Peter Sellers showed up to do his funny Indian accent in one scene as a doctor, evidently using this as a bridge between The Millionairess and The Party. But what you might be considering was where Dorothy Lamour happened to be, as after all in the previous movies there had been a trio of stars.

And not to mention that Dorothy was far more age appropriate to being romanced by the oldsters than Joan Collins, here gamely yet over-earnestly playing the love interest but never convincing as the ideal foil to the duo's antics. Given that Lamour appeared in the last fifteen minutes and looked great, it was even more confounding that she should have been relegated to this - and by all accounts she had to fight to be in the film that long - but it was nice to see her and for that short passage of time some of the former magic was in evidence. Elsewhere, everyone tried hard but it was clear things had moved on, and if they were trying to capture the audience who were now enjoying the Road pictures on television this came up wanting.

Flashbacks see Harry and Chester conducting a typically harebrained scheme where they plan to send a man into space in India, but it predictably goes wrong and Chester loses his memory. To get it back they have to reach, no, not Hong Kong but Tibet, where he is cured with such skill that he attains a photographic memory, so when he is mistakenly passed some top secret rocket papers by Diane in the airport he memorises them, then winds up the sole source of the information when the papers are destroyed. The fact that this hinged on a tremendous mental faculty indicated the filmmakers were keen to show that the boys still had whatever it was that made them popular in the first place and could keep up with whatever young upstarts were emerging in the Swinging Sixties, but while there was the odd funny line and a half decent song and dance number, otherwise it was all rather creaky, especially in the would-be setpieces. The Road to the Fountain of Youth was never made, so while this did not embarrass the stars, it did show how difficult it was to reclaim past glories. Music by Robert Farnon.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2441 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
Paul Smith
  Lee Fiveash
   

 

Last Updated: