HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Black Bear
Don't Cry, Pretty Girls!
Portal
Me You Madness
Reckoning, The
Laddie: The Man Behind the Movies
For the Sake of Vicious
Hell Bent
Straight Shooting
Jules Verne's Rocket to the Moon
Man They Could Not Hang, The
Final Days
Frightened City, The
Assimilate
Sequin in a Blue Room
Common Crime, A
Into the Labyrinth
Power, The
Wake of Death
Night Orchid
Mortal
Iron Mask, The
Dinosaur
Personal History of David Copperfield, The
Dove, The
Collective
Charulata
Minari
Violation
Defending Your Life
Champagne Murders, The
He Dreams of Giants
Lost in America
Take Back
Honeydew
Banishing, The
Drifters, The
Gushing Prayer
Escape from Coral Cove
Swan Princess, The
   
 
Newest Articles
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
   
 
  In Time Counting The Minutes
Year: 2011
Director: Andrew Niccol
Stars: Justin Timberlake, Amanda Seyfried, Cillian Murphy, Vincent Kartheiser, Olivia Wilde, Alex Pettyfer, Johnny Galecki, Matt Bomer, Shyloh Oostwald, Michael William Freeman, Nick Lashaway, Ray Santiago, Collins Pennie, Toby Hemingway, Melissa Ordway
Genre: Action, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: In the future there will be no need for money, and nobody will age past twenty-five years old, which sounds fair enough until you hear the catch: that there is a limit on how far you can live past that age, and if you run out of time then you will die. Therefore time is the new currency, and how much you have left is indicated by a clock on your forearm, with the most impoverished citizens living day to day - literally - and the ones blessed with years ahead of them well out of the ghettos it costs more time to leave. For Will Salas (Justin Timberlake), opportunity is about to come knocking...

Thumpingly heavy-handed metaphor alert! In Time was writer and director Andrew Niccol's further investigation into the science fiction worlds he could make a statement about after penning nineties classic The Truman Show and cult favourite Gattaca, here employing the old adage "Time is money" and taking it as far as that comparison would go in the framework of an action thriller. However, in this instance what you got was a mishmash of would-be Philip K. Dick conceptualisations, The 39 Steps as told by Alfred Hitchcock, and a heavy dose of the Robin Hood story, all straining towards making a statement about society.

Specifically the financial crisis afflicting the world, and by design tapping into the increasing resentment for the well off of this world who were seen by Niccol's script as exploiting the less wealthy: the ordinary bloke (or blokette) in the street, basically. This fighting back against the system is triggered when Will meets a man in a bar called Henry (Matt Bomer), and tries to save him from the so-called Minutemen (led by gangster Alex Pettyfer) who steal time from those who have even the slightest surplus of it. This Henry actually has a full century to play with, but once Will sneaks him out of the bar and to a hideout he gifts it all to him and slips out of the building to fall off a bridge, dead.

Now with all these years to play with Will sets about being generous, as a model of the kind of citizen Niccol thought should be populating the richer end of the social spectrum. It's not enough to save his mother (Olivia Wilde) unfortunately and as she dies in his arms in clunkily contrived fashion he makes up his mind to do something about the injustice in the world, dammit. Off he goes to one of the wealthy sectors, where he catches the attention of lawman Raymond Leon (Cillian Murphy) who is suspicious about where a supposed pleb like Will got all this time from. By and by he starts to gamble and meets rich bastard Vincent Kartheiser, who he wins big from, not least because he attracts his daughter Sylvia (Amanda Seyfried).

Apart from demonstrating to the audience the tricky art of running in high heels for prolonged chase sequences, Seyfried was our leading lady to sum up what a good, hard consciousness-raising can do to a poor little rich girl. Soon she has teamed up with Will and they are setting about liberating all those hours, days, weeks, months and years from the banks and distributing them amongst the poor, but having trouble hanging onto their own time reserves in the process. Honestly, if you took out the amount of scenes where characters press their wrists to each other and we see their clocks either rising or falling then the film would be about half an hour long. But never mind that, it's wealth redistribution Niccol wanted us to contemplate, which was all very well but did look as if the had thought of the politics first and the rest of the plot long afterwards. If the message appealed to you, you might still have trouble balancing that with the unconvincing format. Music by Craig Armstrong.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2803 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Stately Wayne Manor
   

 

Last Updated: