HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
12 Hour Shift
Filmmaker's House, The
Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud, The
Spoilers, The
Killer Therapy
Man Upstairs, The
Bloodhound, The
New Mutants, The
Tesla
Flame of New Orleans, The
Ham on Rye
Imperial Blue
Tenet
August 32nd on Earth
Don is Dead, The
Seven Sinners
Body of Water
Away
Soul
About Endlessness
Let It Snow
Ava
Deliver Us from Evil
Shark Attack 3: Megalodon
Midnight Sky, The
Lego Star Wars Holiday Special, The
Mon Oncle Antoine
Blast of Silence
Blackout, The
Stars in Your Eyes
Alone
Climate of the Hunter
Farewell Amor
Let's Scare Julie
Okko's Inn
Shaolin vs. Wu Tang
Fatman
Butt Boy
Dog of Flanders, The
Bushido Blade, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
Blood Wedding: The Bride with White Hair on Blu-ray
The Inhuman Element: The Ladykillers on 4K UHD
As You Like It, Baby: Breathless on Blu-ray
Stargazing: Light Entertainment Rarities on DVD
Down to the Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 2 on DVD
Herding Cats: Sleepwalkers on Blu-ray
Confessions of a Porn Star: Adult Material on DVD
They're Still Not Sure It is a Baby: Eraserhead on Blu-ray
Werewolves are Real: Dog Soldiers on Digital
   
 
  Caprice Cosmetic Forgery
Year: 1967
Director: Frank Tashlin
Stars: Doris Day, Richard Harris, Ray Walston, Jack Kruschen, Edward Mulhare, Lilia Skala, Irene Tsu, Larry D. Mann, Maurice Marsac, Michael Romanoff, Lisa Seagram, Michael J. Pollard
Genre: Comedy, Romance, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Patricia Foster (Doris Day) is in Paris where she works, and after noting the headline in the newspaper about an Interpol agent "riddled with bullets" in Switzerland she makes her way to the nearest restaurant where she has a meeting. This is with a man who wants an envelope she has of industrial secrets, and after asking firmly for him to take off his trousers so he cannot follow her, she hands over the document and is about to make good her escape when the Sûreté catch her. Her boss, Sir Jason Fox (Edward Mulhare), claims to be baffled - why did she jeopardise her career?

Ah, but did she? There were sundry twists and turns in Caprice, a movie Day claimed she never wanted to do but after frequent showings on television since it flopped in the cinemas, it amassed a cult following among those who found its whimsy appealed to them. Not that it was actually that good, but it was nowhere near as bad as Doris thought it was, and you can see why some divined worth here - not including her co-star Richard Harris, who actively detested it and judged it to be one of his worst efforts (there was a rumour he had walked off a plane when he discovered this was the in-flight movie - while it was in the air!).

Well, maybe he didn't hate it that much, but with Frank Tashlin at the helm you at least had a hope there would be an abundance of goofy gags and a bright, flashy visual sense. On that count you would be correct, but by this stage in his career the sixties had caught up with his style and it wasn't looking quite as hip and happening as it had when, say, he was directing his madcap cartoons or teaching Jerry Lewis all he knew about guiding big screen comedy. Nevertheless, although the strain of trying to keep things as lighthearted as possible did show through many of the sequences, there was something so fluffy about Caprice that made it hard to actively dislike.

At least at this remove where its gloss retained a neat spirit of the popular culture of the decade - not for nothing was the Adam West Batman show appearing on television in one scene, it was a movie that fit this silliness all too well. This in spite of a move towards James Bond spy spoofery that was all the rage and resulted in a deadly ski chase which appeared to foreshadow On Her Majesty's Secret Service of a couple of years later (though without a certain gory punchline). Day was essaying the role of an agent for her boss who had set her up as a candidate for rival Ray Walston's cosmetics firm so she may gather his secrets, but Harris was the complication as a double agent who the audience, never mind Patricia, were unsure about whose side he was on.

He was on his own side, of course, and although playing an Englishman to court comparisons to Cary Grant in Charade he managed some degree of charm, so that you'd never know he wasn't enjoying himself (what a pro) and he did go on to compliment Day, so the experience was not a dead loss. Yes, it was daft to a fault, but there was something to be said for bright and wacky ephemera, and such sequences where Patricia followed model Irene Tsu around to get a lock of her hair to be examined back at the lab - she's wearing a special new hairspray which repels water - were just inane enough to be amusing, especially when Irene's boyfriend turns out to be Michael J. Pollard (there's an odd couple). The trouble with this being as gossamer as it is was that there was precious little to get your teeth into, and while some of the jokes raised a giggle too many others verged on the heavy-handed and obvious. If this sounds like your thing, you'd doubtless appreciate it. Music by De Vol.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3035 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Frank Tashlin  (1913 - 1972)

American director whose films were heavily influenced by his years spent working in cartoons. In his 20s and 30s, Tashlin worked at both Disney and Warner Brothers in their animation studios, before moving into comedy scriptwriting in the late 1940s, on films like Bob Hope's The Paleface. Tashlin moved into directing popular live-action comedies soon after, with Hope in Son of Paleface, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis in Artists and Models and Hollywood or Bust, and most notably Jayne Mansfield in The Girl Can't Help It and Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter? These films were full of inventive, sometimes surreal touches, and used many of the techniques Tashlin had learnt as an animator. Continued to work during the sixties, but without the success of the previous decade.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
Paul Smith
  Lee Fiveash
   

 

Last Updated: