HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Horror Safari Death drums in the jungle
Year: 1981
Director: Alan Birkinshaw
Stars: Stuart Whitman, Edmund Purdom, Woody Strode, Laura Gemser, Glynis Barber, Harold Sakata, David De Martyn, Mike Cohen, Junix Inocian
Genre: Horror, Trash, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: In 1945 a band of Japanese soldiers are attacked by cannibals whilst hiding a fortune in gold somewhere in the Filipino jungle. Thirty-six years later, dastardly treasure hunter Rex Larson (Edmund Purdom) tracks down the survivors, hoping to persuade one of them to hand him the map in return for a half-share. After the first man tries to kill him and the second takes his own life, Larson eventually convinces Tobachi (Harold Sakata) to join the search, but his financier, Douglas Jefferson (David De Martyn) insists on coming along together with his relentlessly cheery daughter Janice (Glynis Barber) and bodyguard Cal (Woody Strode). Jefferson also requests that temperamental alcoholic Mark Forrest (Stuart Whitman) serve as their guide, since it is always a good idea to bring along a belligerent drunk to negotiate those tricky jungle climbs.

Also known as Invaders of the Lost Gold (how can you invade gold?), this cheap and cheerful jungle romp was produced by the infamous, globe-hopping trash movie mogul Dick Randall, who cameos as a dirty old man in the strip joint where we first meet Mark. Compared to nasty, misogynistic Italian cannibal thrillers, Horror Safari is a curiously old fashioned, borderline good natured adventure quickie laced with lurid sex and gore. Alongside down-on-their-luck matinee idols Stuart Whitman and Edmund Purdom (looking genuinely angry to be here), Randall roped in a juicy exploitation cast of has-beens and never weres. Look kids, there’s Harold Sakata who was Bond villain Odd-Job in Goldfinger (1964), playing a karate expert who doesn’t do any. Woody Strode, veteran of John Ford westerns, wearing a ridiculous hat. Glynis Barber, future star of Eighties cop show Dempsey & Makepeace, rates an “and introducing” credit, though she would probably rather forget about this movie.

Another star (of a sort) on the wane and along for the ride is onetime Emmanuelle and Euro sex siren Laura Gemser. Quite why Mark chose to bring her character along is never entirely clear, unless he saw Emanuelle and the Last Cannibals (1977) and figured history might repeat itself with a chance to get laid. Mark has no such luck since Gemser goes skinny-dipping near a waterfall and dies under mysterious circumstances. Nevertheless, every woman around seems irresistibly drawn to Mark in spite of him being beer bloated and bleary-eyed, as well as unable to decide whether his accent is British or American. New Zealand born director Alan Birkinshaw dawdles through the set-up with bar brawls and corny dialogue delaying the descent into jungle madness, although the film still proves low on thrills and high on soap opera subplots. The sound recording is especially poor and quite often vanishes from the film entirely. At least twenty percent of Whitman's dialogue appears to have been dubbed by another performer while Woody Strode's voice was replaced entirely, and inexplicably for that matter.

Birkinshaw was a former rodeo rider whose career vacillated between trashy horrors like Killer’s Moon (1978) and classical music documentaries including The Best of Gilbert and Sullivan (1983) and An Orchestral Tribute to the Beatles (1983). He wound up working for another sultan of schlock: Harry Allan Towers, on remakes of Ten Little Indians (1989) and Masque of the Red Death (1991), the former of which is especially apt given this film is more or less Ten Little Indians on safari. Rex Larson vanishes soon after a suspected crocodile attack and a mysterious killer begins bumping off the treasure hunters, one by one. Sakata gets his throat slit. Strode falls off rope-bridge that must be all of four feet off the ground. Whenever a killing occurs, Birkinshaw opts for a super slow-motion, frame-by-frame technique that only adds to the absurdity. Mucho macho Stuart Whitman stays alive but often looks like he wishes he were dead. Remarkably, he went through the whole ordeal again three years later in the livelier remake Treasure of the Amazon (1985).

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 4234 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: