HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Tape, The
Limbo
Supernova
Man Who Sold His Skin, The
Sweetheart
No Man of God
Gaia
Oliver Sacks: His Own Life
Scenes with Beans
Sweat
Quiet Place Part II, A
Nobody
Prisoners of the Ghostland
Duel to the Death
Mandibles
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands
Yakuza Princess
Djinn, The
New Order
Triggered
Claw
Original Cast Album: Company
Martyrs Lane
Paper Tigers, The
Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, The
Hall
ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt, The
Collini Case, The
Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard
Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch, The
Superhost
Plan A
When I'm a Moth
Tigers Are Not Afraid
Misha and the Wolves
Yellow Cat
Shorta
Knocking
Bloodthirsty
When the Screaming Starts
   
 
Newest Articles
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
   
 
  Mimic Join Our Insect Nation
Year: 1997
Director: Guillermo del Toro
Stars: Mira Sorvino, Jeremy Northam, Alexander Goodwin, Giancarlo Giannini, Charles S. Dutton, Josh Brolin, Alix Koromzay, F. Murray Abraham, James Costa, Javon Barnwell, Norman Reedus, Pak-Kwong Ho, Glenn Bang
Genre: HorrorBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 4 votes)
Review: Three years ago a terrible epidemic was affecting the children of New York City; the lucky ones would end up in leg braces for the rest of their lives, the unlucky ones did not survive at all. The disease was carried by the city's cockroaches, so an entomologist, Dr Susan Tyler (Mira Sorvino), was called in to supply a way to kill off the insects: she created a hybrid which managed to eliminate them forever and save the city's children for good. Not only that, but the official in charge of the operation, Dr Peter Mann (Peter Northam) became her husband, though now their cure has had unforseen consequences...

Mimic was Guillermo del Toro's first American film after the international success of his unusual Mexican vampire movie Cronos, and he was brought north to work with the Weinsteins, known for picking up promising filmmakers for what they hoped would be lucrative partnerships. Alas for del Toro, the Weinsteins were far more "hands on" than he had anticipated, and the resulting film not only flopped, but was disowned by him as not being faithful to his vision - for a start, the ending had been changed to a far happier one. So after all that you might expect this to be an orphaned movie, with nobody enthusiastic about it.

Yet the director's artistic cachet was far too great thanks to his following productions for Mimic to be ignored, and though it had not done much business originally (despite the reaction of those who did see it being generally favourable), it did find those who appreciated it wishing to welcome it into the del Toro canon, even if the man himself was not so keen. But seeing it now, you can understand why it was dismissed back in 1997 as merely another monster flick as there's a monotonous quality to the plotline and action, for that matter, with the characters getting into one potentially disgusting scenario after another.

Trouble is, the actual villains are somewhat far fetched, the descendants of the cockroach killers now running rampant in the subway and grown not only to human size, but able to, well, mimic human beings by looking a bit like a bloke in a raincoat, if you don't look too hard at them. Naturally they're people eaters, although quite what a predator that big is existing on these three years past is not adequately explained as someone would surely have noticed great swathes of the New York City population disappearing as they were picked off by their new neighbours. Yet the script endeavours to make the insects as scientifically believable as possible, which leaves the film seeming more like fifties sci-fi where every creature feature had to have its expert delineating the reasons behind the monsters.

That said, there are interesting bits and pieces to be salvaged, such as the theme of Susan not being able to get pregnant with her husband, with the queasy implication being that the giant bugs are her true offspring if only she would accept them. This goes precisely nowhere once the film resolves itself into yet another of those run away from the horrors chillers, and the more generic Mimic grows, the less entertaining it is, with scene after scene of the characters, who have ended up trapped in the abandoned areas of the subway, getting up close and personal with the insects who mean to have them for dinner. Though for all its sticky sound effects and shots of gloopiness, you're rarely moved one way or the other as it never presents itself as especially convincing. It was a nice idea to update vintage sci-fi and horror, but there were plenty having this idea in the nineties, and Mimic simply did not stand out. Music by Marco Beltrami.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3216 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Guillermo del Toro  (1964 - )

Stylish Mexican horror director who moves between personal projects and Hollywood blockbusters. After a couple of short films, he earned international attention with unusual vampire chiller Cronos. Mimic was an artistically disappointing follow up, but he enjoyed success with vampire action sequel Blade II, spooky ghost story The Devil's Backbone, and another horror comic adaptation, Hellboy. Spanish Civil War fantasy Pan's Labyrinth was widely seen as a triumph and won three Oscars. After a long spell in production hell since Hellboy II, he returned with giant monster mash Pacific Rim and gothic chiller Crimson Peak. The Shape of Water, an unconventional horror romance, garnered him Oscars.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: