HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Prisoners of the Ghostland
Duel to the Death
Mandibles
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands
Yakuza Princess
Djinn, The
New Order
Triggered
Claw
Original Cast Album: Company
Martyrs Lane
Paper Tigers, The
Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, The
Hall
ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt, The
Collini Case, The
Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard
Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch, The
Superhost
Plan A
When I'm a Moth
Tigers Are Not Afraid
Misha and the Wolves
Yellow Cat
Shorta
Knocking
Bloodthirsty
When the Screaming Starts
Sweetie, You Won't Believe It
Lions Love
Demonic
Night Drive
Luca
Prospect
Toll, The
Last Bus, The
Purple Sea
Pebble and the Boy, The
Mosquito State
Lina from Lima
   
 
Newest Articles
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
   
 
  Molière The Play's The Thing
Year: 2007
Director: Laurent Tirard
Stars: Romain Duris, Fabrice Luchini, Laura Morante, Edouard Baer, Ludivine Sagnier, Fanny Valette, Gonzague Montuel, Gilian Petrovski, Sophie-Charlotte Husson, Anne Suarez, Annelise Hesme, Luc Tremblais, Nicolas Vaude, Philippe du Janerand, Isabelle Caubère
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Romance, HistoricalBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 2 votes)
Review: The year is 1658, and the famed playwright and actor Molière (Romain Duris) has returned after a successful tour to the theatre given to him by the King a troubled man. In spite of the public loving his comedies, what he really wants to do is write profound tragedies and he makes up his mind that this is what his next project will be, much to the dismay of his troupe. However, when he goes to visit the King, the monarch is so excited about seeing another comedy from him that Molière realises it would be occupational suicide to refuse, and so sits down, quill in hand, that very night, drawing on his memories for inspiration...

Which is the cue for us to head back further in time, thirteen years back, to land the French playwright in a situation befitting one of his plays. When this was released, many took the view that it was aping the Oscar-winning hit Shakespeare in Love, what with taking a celebrated writer of the seventeenth (ish) century and constructing a romance around him with himself as leading man, and watching it you cannot be sure that is where writer and director Laurent Tirard took his inspiration, although he wasn't the first filmmaker to create a movie around this particular individual. Even the construction is similar in tone, with early comedy giving way to more serious musing over the nature of creativity.

Not to mention putting its protagonist through an amount of heartache. What Molière is recalling here as he spends a long dark night of the soul in front of his desk is a time where he was a struggling actor failing to make much headway as a tragedian, and ending up bankrupt as a result. There is a light at the end of the tunnel, though, as a nobleman, Jourdain (Fabrice Luchini), pays for him to be released from a debtor's prison on the understanding that he go along with his plans to turn the wealthy but vain toff into a great thespian. We can see from the start this is an arrangement doomed to failure, as Jourdain is hopelessly lacking any talent, and believing his money will buy him what he wants.

What he actually wants is to impress a local rich widow, Célimène (Ludivine Sagnier), who he has been told by his best friend Dorante (Edouard Baer) is interested in him. Nothing could be further from the truth and the film's themes of subterfuge and fakery are brought out in the fact that Dorante actually wants Jourdain to marry his daughter to his son, thereby offering them both financial security. Of course, that's not the only manner in which these themes are exhibited, because we have Molière to contend with, or rather he has Madame Jourdain (Laura Morante) to contend with, as while we cannot see how she ended up married to such a mean-minded buffoon, we can see that Molière would find her very attractive.

If only he was not disguised as a priest, then they could find happiness - well, not really, as here lies the main problem with this film. It's supposed to be a comedy, but isn't the slightest bit funny, and much of this is down to the heaviness of the romance. Tirard puts his characters through such misery - even Jourdain gets his moment of sympathy when he finds out what Célimène really thinks of him - that what was presumably intended to be a light soufflé ends up flat as a pancake. It doesn't do the mood any benefit that when we are presented with a comic setpiece, not only is it plonked into the middle of the story with a ton weight, there's little witty about it and does not do justice to the genuine playwright's reputation. All concerned are more comfortable with the serious stuff than they are with bringing out the humour, though Sagnier might have promised more with that if she had had more screen time; otherwise this is leaden stuff. Music by Frédéric Talgorn.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2800 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: