HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
We Need to Do Something
Falbalas
Vanguard
A-X-L
Injustice
Bigfoot Hunters
Armitage III: Polymatrix
Girls Nite Out
Moxie!
Five Women for the Killer
Dolce Vita, La
Pig
I Am Belmaya
Lodger, The
Show, The
Beta Test, The
Medium, The
John and the Hole
Survivalist, The
Ape Woman, The
Black Widow
Cop Secret
Dark Eyes of London, The
V/H/S/94
Fay Grim
Night of the Animated Dead
Freshman Year
Escape Room: Tournament of Champions
Anne at 13,000 Ft.
Even Mice Belong in Heaven
Death Screams
Freakscene: The Story of Dinosaur Jr.
Demonia
East, The
Mandabi
Seance
Green Knight, The
Beasts of No Nation
One of Our Aircraft is Missing
Picture Stories
   
 
Newest Articles
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
   
 
  Watchmen One Minute To Midnight
Year: 2009
Director: Zack Snyder
Stars: Malin Akerman, Billy Crudup, Matthew Goode, Jackie Earle Haley, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Patrick Wilson, Carla Gugino, Matt Frewer, Stephen McHattie, Laura Mennell, Rob LaBelle, Gary Houston, James M. Connor, Mary Ann Burger, John Shaw, Robert Wisden
Genre: Action, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: It is the nineteen-eighties and the world is different to how we remember it: for a start, there were no costumed superheroes around back then, but there are here, and one of them, The Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) is relaxing in his New York City apartment watching television. He has done many evil things in his life, but he could always justify them to himself as most were in the service of his vision of the American Dream, yet now perhaps these acts will catch up with him. As he watches yet another debate on the possibility of global nuclear war, he is unaware that right outside his front door there is someone about to burst in who will kill him...

So the Comedian doesn't need to worry about the upcoming conflict, but here it's everyone else who does. Watchmen was one of the defining works in comics at a time in the eighties when people started to take them seriously: without betraying their origins artists and writers such as Frank Miller and Neil Gaiman were having their work talked about in such tones as those reserved for literature by readers who felt that finally the medium had come of age and could face adult subject matter without sacrificing the elements which made these works recognisably of their genre. Sure, Miller's The Dark Knight Returns was held up as the American epitome of how well this could be produced, but there was another writer across the Atlantic generating maybe even more respect.

He was Alan Moore, and his Watchmen is often held up as the comic book, excuse me, graphic novel that stretched the boundaries to illustrate the full potential of those picturebooks. Working with artist Dave Gibbons, he created a masterpiece that, if appearances are to be believed, was the envy not only of the comics industry but the movie world as well as filmmakers toiled for two decades to adapt Watchmen to the big screen. Famously, Moore was less than impressed with these efforts and refused to have his name on his filmed works if he could help it, but with this item, there were those who said that he had prematurely misjudged the production as here was a movie which finally got Moore right.

As the dust settled and that initial hyperbole died down, Zack Snyder's Watchmen did not quite look quite as revolutionary as many thought, or hoped, as it took its place among the umpteen comic book adaptations of the day as visually impressive, but dramatically hollow as if faithfully recreating the imagery had not been enough, and it's true that the film's greatest sequence is its titles, which fill in the story so far in a series of clips, some barely moving, where we understand that Richard Nixon is still President, superheroes won the Vietnam War, those heroes who did not toe the government line were dispatched with and outlawed, oh, and The Comedian assassinated President Kennedy.

If nothing else this proves the power not of movies, but the comics they seek to emulate, as everything after that is respectful to its source to the point where you might be wondering why they didn't animate the frames of the original. Fans of the book will find the novelty of seeing live action versions of the drawings is considerable, but the film rarely tackles the strong sense of morality that Moore infused his writing with. It's a nice try, but you're more likely to be musing over whether this had to be quite so long or alternatively looking forward to the next action sequence than you are pondering over the weight of the debates that the material brings up. Here, the heroes find their sense of right and wrong was never as clear as they all hoped it would be when they got into the crimefighting business, and the fact that they have to act immorally for the greater good is something that corrupts each and every one of them to varying degrees. It's provocative stuff, yet ill-served by a brave, impeccable-looking attempt that allows the whole thing to boil down to a middling sci-fi conceit with a twist ending. Snyder didn't so much bring the comic to life as pickle it. Music by Tyler Bates.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2883 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: