HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Supernova
Man Who Sold His Skin, The
Sweetheart
No Man of God
Gaia
Oliver Sacks: His Own Life
Scenes with Beans
Sweat
Quiet Place Part II, A
Nobody
Prisoners of the Ghostland
Duel to the Death
Mandibles
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands
Yakuza Princess
Djinn, The
New Order
Triggered
Claw
Original Cast Album: Company
Martyrs Lane
Paper Tigers, The
Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, The
Hall
ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt, The
Collini Case, The
Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard
Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch, The
Superhost
Plan A
When I'm a Moth
Tigers Are Not Afraid
Misha and the Wolves
Yellow Cat
Shorta
Knocking
Bloodthirsty
When the Screaming Starts
Sweetie, You Won't Believe It
Lions Love
   
 
Newest Articles
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
   
 
  Phantom, The The Ghost Who Stumbled
Year: 1996
Director: Simon Wincer
Stars: Billy Zane, Kristy Swanson, Treat Williams, Catherine Zeta-Jones, James Remar, Cary-Hiroyuki Tagawa, Bill Smitrovich, Casey Siemaszko, David Proval, Joseph Ragno, Samantha Eggar, Jon Tenney, Patrick McGoohan, Robert Coleby, Al Ruscio, Leon Russom
Genre: Action, Fantasy, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: A long time ago, a young boy was on a ship with his father when they were attacked by pirates. The father was killed and the boy escaped overboard to be washed up on the shore of a remote land and was adopted by the tribe there who taught him the secrets of the Ancients. Now, in 1938, a group of explorers are investigating that land in the search for a precious ornamental skull as ordered by their boss, rich industrialist Xander Drax (Treat Williams). They find the way tough going, and nearly lose their lives venturing over a rickety bridge, but do find a lost temple and the skull within. Only now they must face the wrath of The Ghost Who Walks: aka The Phantom (Billy Zane)...

Before comic book movies became really big business in the twenty-first century, there were a few not so certain steps towards making the genre a regular hit in the nineties, and The Phantom was one of those, becoming every bit as popular as The Shadow and The Rocketeer in the process, i.e., hardly anybody went to see it. There was perhaps a feeling with these properties that they were a little old hat with their period settings and heroes that few outside their true fans (in Australia, it seems in this case) would ever have recalled, and the fact that Billy Zane was dressed up in a skintight purple suit didn't do much for his credibility. The conclusion was that this was another flop attempt to start a franchise, so Batman this was decidedly not.

And yet, there were those who understood what the filmmakers were trying here, as much a return to the derring-do of Indiana Jones as it was a hark back to the serial adventures that they were indebted to with its jungle setting, ancient artefacts of incredible power and ever so slightly spoofy tone that contrasted with seriousness they took their dedication to providing genuine thrills. Fair enough, those thrills were difficult to take seriously on that level, but The Phantom was a decent enough try even if it was not as successful as it would have liked to be. Bruce Campbell was the original choice for the role, but Zane was a similar kind of talent, cartoonishly handsome and with an air of self-mockery.

Which makes you wonder why they simply didn't stick with Bruce, but Billy it was, and he finds the right tone to pitch his performance, although he could have done with some more self-aware dialogue and quips (he does say at one point he never kids, but maybe he could have given it a go for the sake of the film). The Phantom lives in his jungle lair with only a horse, a wolf and a henchman for company, but he's ready to spring into action should the need arise, and the theft of the silver skull of something-or-other is one of those times. As it turns out, Drax's main lackey (James Remar) does get away with the object and takes it to pre-Second World War New York City, lovingly recreated here with as much care as The Shadow had.

Not that audiences of the day had much interest in period detail, and you can understand why this would have been considered strictly second division, with its cast of recognisable faces but not exactly megastar wattage and slavish commitment to conjuring up yesteryear's excitement. Kristy Swanson takes the love interest role as adventuress Diana Palmer, who our hero takes a shine to but his motives are put into question when it's made clear he really needs an heir to continue the Phantom line. Well, he seems sincere enough about liking her. Williams plays it suave as the baddie, backed up by Catherine Zeta-Jones as his pilot and bodyguard who has a change of sides when Diana troubles her conscience, and for true oddity, Patrick McGoohan shows up to appear as The Phantom's Dad (that's the way he's credited), a ghostly presence who narrates and only his son can see. It's not going to take a place in the pantheon of classic superhero movies, but you can see what they were aiming for and it's harmless, good-natured entertainment. Music by David Newman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3895 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Simon Wincer  (1943 - )

Australian director who began working in TV in his homeland. Directed the horror flick Snapshot, before heading to Hollywood scoring a hit with the sci-fi adventure D.A.R.Y.L. Wincer had success on the small screen with the award-winning western Lonesome Dove and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, and on the big screen directed the likes of Free Willy, Quigley Down Under and The Phantom.

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: