HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Don't Breathe 2
Closing Time
Cryptozoo
Weathering with You
Rim of the World
Love & Basketball
JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time
Trapped
We Need to Do Something
Falbalas
Vanguard
A-X-L
Injustice
Bigfoot Hunters
Armitage III: Polymatrix
Girls Nite Out
Moxie!
Five Women for the Killer
Dolce Vita, La
Pig
I Am Belmaya
Lodger, The
Show, The
Beta Test, The
Medium, The
John and the Hole
Survivalist, The
Ape Woman, The
Black Widow
Cop Secret
Dark Eyes of London, The
V/H/S/94
Fay Grim
Night of the Animated Dead
Freshman Year
Escape Room: Tournament of Champions
Anne at 13,000 Ft.
Even Mice Belong in Heaven
Death Screams
Freakscene: The Story of Dinosaur Jr.
   
 
Newest Articles
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
   
 
  Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins And Ends
Year: 1985
Director: Guy Hamilton
Stars: Fred Ward, Joel Grey, Wilford Brimley, J.A. Preston, George Coe, Charles Cioffi, Kate Mulgrew, Patrick Kilpatrick, Michael Pataki, Davenia McFadden, Cosie Costa, Reginald VelJohnson, Jon Polito, William Hickey
Genre: Action, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 2 votes)
Review: A New York City cop (Fred Ward) is sitting in his patrol car one night, eating a snack and drinking his coffee, when he notices a man running away from two thugs. With a sigh, the cop gets out and advances on them as the thugs catch up with their quarry, and tries to break up the scuffle, but suddenly the assailants turn on him and an all-out brawl ensues, with even the victim who was being chased getting in on the act, but the cop is sufficiently skilled to knock out the three of them. Satisfied that they are now incapable, the cop returns to his car and resumes his snack, but his problems are not over as a huge truck appears behind him and starts pushing his vehicle towards the river...

It's an essentially optimistic act, making a movie, as you do so in the belief that someone wants to see your opus and that audience will provide you with the funds and kudos to make another one. Thus this, the first in the films adapted from the Destroyer series of novels had the subtitle The Adventure Begins, although in Britain it was simply called Remo: Unarmed and Dangerous, that title change as if to say, well, nobody's going to turn up to see another one of these. And so it came to pass that the U.K. distributor was correct, and Remo Williams became a footnote of those cinematic outings that hoped for yet never got another instalment.

It's easy to see what the turn off was here, and that was the action takes far too long to get going. Fair enough, the Remo character has to be given his origin and background story, but this takes up a whopping hour of a two-hour-long film, and you can imagine people growing restless with yet another training session when you really want our hero to make with the mission that we keep being promised. After the cop has been drowned in the river, he is revived and given plastic surgery to look even more like Fred Ward, then told he will now be called Remo Williams and given extensive lessons in unarmed combat.

The reason for this? He has been recruited by a group of shadowy operatives who have access to their own special internet (something this film appears to have predicted) that helps them track down evildoers on behalf of the President himself. Considering there only appear to be three people in this organisation, you have to wonder how often they are called upon, especially as one of their number is an eighty-year-old Korean martial arts expert. Well, he's supposed to be Korean, but he's actually Cabaret star Joel Grey under some very convincing makeup that is let down somewhat by his cod-oriental "Bruddy Irriot!" Benny Hill-style dialogue. Still, this is who Remo takes up half the running time hanging around with, learning his craft.

This was directed by Guy Hamilton, a sure hand with the James Bond franchise taking Moonraker scribe Christopher Wood with him in the hopes of creating a fresh moneyspinning series that was not to be. It's not all a dead loss, however, as there are bright spots: Ward is an agreeably wry presence once he settles into his character, and the stunt work is particularly excellent, with Ward's stand-ins performing such hair-raising acts as hanging from a ferris wheel and most famously off the Statue of Liberty while it is being renovated as a group of heavies try to make him fall. There's also a neat sequence where Remo has to outwit a pack of highly intelligent guard dogs as he tracks down a new spy satellite. The cast is somewhat less than starry, all very capable performers but unlikely to set the pulse racing of the average movie fanatic, and the impression is of a sincere attempt that lacked that spark of vitality; it's more like a TV pilot. Music by Craig Safan.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3068 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: