HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Don't Breathe 2
Closing Time
Cryptozoo
Weathering with You
Rim of the World
Love & Basketball
JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time
Trapped
We Need to Do Something
Falbalas
Vanguard
A-X-L
Injustice
Bigfoot Hunters
Armitage III: Polymatrix
Girls Nite Out
Moxie!
Five Women for the Killer
Dolce Vita, La
Pig
I Am Belmaya
Lodger, The
Show, The
Beta Test, The
Medium, The
John and the Hole
Survivalist, The
Ape Woman, The
Black Widow
Cop Secret
Dark Eyes of London, The
V/H/S/94
Fay Grim
Night of the Animated Dead
Freshman Year
Escape Room: Tournament of Champions
Anne at 13,000 Ft.
Even Mice Belong in Heaven
Death Screams
Freakscene: The Story of Dinosaur Jr.
   
 
Newest Articles
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
   
 
  Assault on a Queen All at Sea
Year: 1966
Director: Jack Donahue
Stars: Frank Sinatra, Virna Lisi, Anthony Franciosa, Alf Kjellin, Errol John, Richard Conte, Reginald Denny
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: A group of treasure hunters approach deep sea diver Mark Brittain (Frank Sinatra) to search for a sunken galleon. Reluctant at first, money troubles eventually drive Mark and his friend Linc Langley (Errol John) to partner with beautiful high-roller Rosa Lucchesi (Virna Lisi), her slimy boyfriend Vic Rossiter (Anthony Franciosa), and former Nazi u-boat captain Eric Lauffnauer (Alf Kjellin) on this dangerous dive. Instead of the galleon, Mark discovers a sunken Nazi submarine, which Lauffnauer decides to raise and refit and stage and audacious ocean heist upon the luxury liner, the Queen Mary.

Based on a novel by Invasion of the Body Snatchers author Jack Finney, Assault on a Queen aims to be a sort of The Asphalt Jungle (1950) at sea, but is nowhere as taut. In fact it’s downright leisurely, constrained by a talky script by Twilight Zone creator Rod Serling far too hung up on the romantic tension between Mark and Rosa while supporting characters lounge about, smoke endless cigarettes, and switch from canny conspirators to panicky idiots amidst the last twenty minutes. Sinatra and Lisi are class acts, but the former trades largely on his Rat Pack cool being laid back to the point of nonchalance, while the latter is reduced to glamour gal despite being a great actress as well as a great beauty. Check out her award-winning turn in La Reine Margot (1994) as proof.

Co-financed by Sinatra’s own production company, the man behind the camera was Jack Donahue, a onetime chorus boy who made the Disney musical Babes in Toyland (1961), but was largely a TV hand including sitcoms and episodes of The Frank Sinatra Show. Glossy cinematography by William Daniels and William H. Clothier imparts a seductive sheen upon everything from the ocean view to Lisi’s suntanned legs, but Donahue brings nary an ounce of zest to the B-movie plot.

Much of it rests on Mark’s moral dilemmas and the intricacies of planning the sea hijack, with wrinkles caused by Vic’s inability to master a British accent and intervention from the U.S. Coast Guard. Franciosa’s ill-characterised villain trades tough talk with Sinatra, but while greedy, racist and self-centred, emerges more foolish than menacing. Crime film veteran Richard Conte turns up later as the engineer hired to refurbish the sub, but his character switches from matey to menace at the drop of a hat.

Every submarine movie features at least one episode wherein they run silent to avoid depth charges from above. Here, Donahue finally works up some tension when Mark refuses to fire on a U.S. vessel, although fails to explain why the hitherto ice-cool Lauffnauer panics so easily he abandons the loot. Swinging soundtrack by Duke Ellington.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 5122 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: