HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Gaia
Oliver Sacks: His Own Life
Scenes with Beans
Sweat
Quiet Place Part II, A
Nobody
Prisoners of the Ghostland
Duel to the Death
Mandibles
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands
Yakuza Princess
Djinn, The
New Order
Triggered
Claw
Original Cast Album: Company
Martyrs Lane
Paper Tigers, The
Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, The
Hall
ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt, The
Collini Case, The
Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard
Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch, The
Superhost
Plan A
When I'm a Moth
Tigers Are Not Afraid
Misha and the Wolves
Yellow Cat
Shorta
Knocking
Bloodthirsty
When the Screaming Starts
Sweetie, You Won't Believe It
Lions Love
Demonic
Night Drive
Luca
Prospect
   
 
Newest Articles
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
   
 
  Con Air Just Plane Dangerous
Year: 1997
Director: Simon West
Stars: Nicolas Cage, John Cusack, John Malkovich, Ving Rhames, Nick Chinlund, Steve Buscemi, Colm Meaney, Rachel Ticotin, Dave Chapelle, Mykelti Williamson, Danny Trejo, M.C. Gainey, Steve Eastin, Renoly Santiago, Monica Potter, Landry Allbright, Brendan Kelly
Genre: Action, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 3 votes)
Review: A few years ago, Cameron Poe (Nicolas Cage) left the U.S. Army and headed back to Alabama to be with his now-pregnant wife Tricia (Monica Potter). She worked in a smalltown bar, but when Cameron returned and met her there the night he arrived, they were approached by three thugs who tried to wind him up. He was having none of this, and Tricia convinced him not to get into a fight like he used to do, but once they left the bar later to go home, the thugs were waiting and jumped him. He fought them off, but killed one of them in the process, which explains why he has spent the best part of a decade in prison for manslaughter. But now he's getting out - isn't he?

Say what you like about Jerry Bruckheimer movies, he had the money to assemble an impressive cast, and one of his best lineups of talent appeared in Con Air, as far as the men went, anyway, as in this film what women turned up were solely present to be protected by the guys. This was the first of Bruckheimer's movies without the recently deceased Don Simpson, but any queries over whether he could get by without his legendary bad boy business partner were quickly dismisssed when this went on to be one of the biggest hits of the year. And yet, somehow it remains curiously forgotten about in hindsight.

Not completely, but for those who pick their favourite action movies of the period, Bruckheimer's The Rock is more likely to come out ahead, which is a shame because Con Air is far more of a breezy jaunt into action, thrills and laughs, all the things that make up the best of this kind of production. Nobody was going to award it a host of prestigious gongs, but it did know its audience were not entirely made up of the type of people who would have been sharing jailtime with Cameron. So as well as sensitive he-man Cage, for the blue-collar family man types, there was John Cusack playing U.S. Marshal Larkin to give someone the nerds to identify with.

Of course, there were some Hollywooded-up convicts to admire as well, all with nicknames as if they'd stepped out of a Batman comic book. There may have been a heavy influence of the Airport movies here, as every aeroplane plot with a thriller element did once those melodramas had been hits, but there was another work leaning over writer Scott Rosenberg's shoulder, and that was The Silence of the Lambs. Or more accurately, Anthony Hopkins' reading of Hannibal Lecter, who had proved to the money men that putting a diabolical criminal in your film as the man you love to hate would do wonders for your box office potential.

Therefore not only in this stellar cast does John Malkovich enjoy himself as the evil mastermind behind hijacking the flight that Cameron is hoping will land safely as he is on it to be paroled this very day, but you also get Ving Rhames as a black supremacist turned terrorist and Steve Buscemi as a serial killer who is supposed to be more dangerous than any of them, along with sundry hard men and comic relief characters. Sentiment rears its head with Cameron wishing to meet his daughter for the first time, and not only that but it's her birthday, and if you want more he has a fluffy pink bunny to give her as a present, which gives the opportunity for lines like "Put the bunneh back in the bawx", spoken in Cage's dodgy Deep South accent. It ends up with bullets flying, planes crashing, and fire engines careering, but there's enough of a sense of humour here to say, yes, it's ridiculous, but where else are you going to have fun like this? that has Con Air standing out as an unfairly unappreciated instalment of the nineties action juggernauts. Music by Mark Mancina and Trevor Rabin.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5061 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Jason Cook
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: