HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
True Don Quixote, The
Babymother
Mitchells vs. the Machines, The
Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Unholy, The
How to Deter a Robber
Antebellum
Offering, The
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
   
 
Newest Articles
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
   
 
  Magic Sword, The The Old George And Dragon
Year: 1962
Director: Bert I. Gordon
Stars: Basil Rathbone, Estelle Winwood, Gary Lockwood, Anne Helm, Liam Sullivan, Danielle De Metz, Merritt Stone, Jacques Gallo, David R. Cross, Vampira, Angelo Rossitto, Richard Kiel
Genre: Fantasy, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 2 votes)
Review: Sybil (Estelle Winwood) is a sorceress of the decent variety, and is lamenting her adopted son George (Gary Lockwood), now grown into a man, is more interested in Princess Helene (Anne Helm) than learning any more from her. Sybil doesn't think the Princess is worth pursuing, but George is smitten and spies on her bathing in a pond through the use of a magic lake which shows him all he wants - something handy picked up from mother. But as Helene is drying off, an apparition appears and spirits her away - could this be something to do with the evil wizard Lodac (Basil Rathbone)?

Why, yes, it could. This was producer and director Bert I. Gordon's attempt at a St George and the Dragon style rendering of a tale of yore, a venerable legend that here is reduced to something you might have seen on television of the day, the budget not being particularly high. It certainly begins on sitcom level, and if it were not bad enough that our dashing hero is a Peeping Tom, he also has an overinflated opinion of himself. When Helene is kidnapped as revenge against the King's execution of Lodac's sister, George thinks it will be a cinch to get her back.

Especially when he has the assistance of his mother's magic armour, shield and, but of course, that sword of the title, which glows at crucial points so you know it's something special. Not that Sybil wants him to go, and he is forced to lock her in a cellar to get away - is that any way to treat your mother? To help along the journey, George additionally revives six knights of various nationalities and varying degrees of convincing accents, so they can be the suckers who succumb to the seven deadly curses of Lodac instead of him.

Off they trot, and the first curse they meet is an ogre, as being a Bert I. Gordon film they had to go up against a giant monster somewhere along the way, the dragon granted. After a while the story looks as if it could have been adapted into a pretty good computer game, with George and the boys moving up a level with each curse and losing lives in the process. Such things were not thought of in 1962 however, and it just means the experience is a bit of a plod through encounters with such dangers as a killer jacuzzi and a spinning hypno-wheel that will turn you into a zombie.

All the while we keep cutting back to Lodac and Rathbone emoting as if he were offering us his Richard the Third rather than a cut-price trickster. He gleefully feeds some other princesses to the dragon, cunningly kept off screen until the last possible moment, and commands an army of what appear to be Saturday Night Live's Coneheads, lifting the enterprise a notch whenever he appears. Lockwood settles down into being a pretty stock protagonist for this kind of thing, and a few horror moments, some provided by a heavily made-up Vampira herself (you know, from Plan 9 from Outer Space), sustain your waning interest until an admittedly fairly impressive dragon climaxes the film. If you don't mind its decidedly Californian approach to Merrie Old English myth, then The Magic Sword is fine for what it is. Music by Richard Markowitz.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3653 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Bert I. Gordon  (1922 - )

Known as Mister B.I.G., this American writer, director and producer came from advertising to make a host of giant monster movies in the 1950s - King Dinosaur, Beginning of the End, The Cyclops, The Amazing Colossal Man, Earth vs the Spider and War of the Colossal Beast. Attack of the Puppet People featured minituarisation, as a variation.

The 60s saw him make various fantasy and horror movies, such as Tormented, The Magic Sword, Village of the Giants and Picture Mommy Dead. The 1970s only offered two giant monster movies, Food of the Gods and Empire of the Ants, plus horror Necromancy and thriller The Mad Bomber. Subsequent films in the eighties were made with the video market in mind, and he made a comeback in 2015 at the age of 93 (!) with psycho-horror Secrets of a Psychopath.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: