HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Body Snatchers I, Pod Person
Year: 1993
Director: Abel Ferrara
Stars: Gabrielle Anwar, Terry Kinney, Billy Wirth, Christine Elise, R. Lee Ermey, G. Elvis Phillips, Reilly Murphy, Kathleen Doyle, Forest Whitaker, Meg Tilly, Stanley Small, Tonea Stewart, Keith Smith, Winston E. Grant, Phil Neilson
Genre: Horror, Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: Teenage Marti Malone (Gabrielle Anwar) remembers how this all started. She was being brought to the military base where her scientist father (Terry Kinney) was going to spend the summer working, and he had taken her, Marti's stepmother Carol (Meg Tilly) and her half-brother Andy (Reilly Murphy) with him to stay there. Marti had hit her rebellious phase, and was reluctant to go, but without any other options she didn't have much choice. However, something happened when they stopped at a gas station and she went to use the bathroom: there was a soldier in there, panicking, telling her that they get you when you fall asleep...

It was an old story even when this, the third official version of Jack Finney's classic science fiction novel The Body Snatchers, was made, and in spite of some warm reviews, director Abel Ferrara's re-imagining was met with little success and slipped from the public memory almost as if it had never been made. And yet there were a staunch few who, being fans of Ferrara, were not willing to let go of this film so easily; with a roster of writing talent behind the script including cult filmmakers Larry Cohen and Stuart Gordon, perhaps it should not have been dismissed so easily.

Starting with a title sequence that apparently thought it was introducing a remake of Superman: The Movie, Ferrara launches his tale with a style best described as headachey, with the daytime shots taken in too-bright sunlight, making the actors' faces fittinglly obscure as the questions of identity customary to this plot begin to surface. Needless to say, the nighttime scenes are just as unnerving, as that is when the characters fall asleep, but even though this is a brief run through of points from the original, it still takes its time in allowing the big reveal.

It's either a clever idea setting the film on a military base where conformity is the order of the day, or a pretty stupid one, and it's one of the off-kilter strengths of the movie that both could be the case simultaneously. For a start, if aliens are replacing the military with pod people who do exactly as they are told and permit no idiosyncrasies, then how will we know the difference - why bother changing them at all? On the other hand, the aliens represent this social structure taken to an extreme, and the fact that the difference is so hard to detect makes for more worrying possibilities.

We can see Marti is a rebel, but she is undergoing a more familiar teenage form of kicking against authority, specifically her father, resenting the fact that her mother has been "replaced" by the hippy-dippy Carol, and she even has a new brother to factor into her life. The script is littered with people who do not conform, either in a friendly way or a more disruptive fashion, and after a while sequences like the one where everyone in Andy's class draws the same, abstract picture except him are marking out those who have succumbed to the pods and those who have not. Tilly is especially great, showing her skill as she goes from spacey in a good way to spacey in a bad way: she gets the film's best speech as well. Ending ambiguously, but with somewhat unnecessary explosions which seem out of place after such a suspenseful piece, Body Snatchers held its own as a valuable addition to a very decent run of such films. Music by Joe Delia.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5011 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Abel Ferrara  (1952 - )

Controversial New York director whose films frequently centre around sex, violence and moral redemption, and often feature Harvey Keitel, Christopher Walken or Willem Dafoe. Debuted in 1979 with the infamous Driller Killer, in which he also starred, followed by rape-revenge thriller Ms. 45/Angel of Vengeance. Several slick, less distinctive movies followed - Fear City, China Girl and Cat Chaser, as well as work on TV shows Miami Vice and Crime Story.

1990's King of New York was a return to form, while the searing Bad Lieutenant quickly became the most notorious, and perhaps best, film of Ferrara's career. The nineties proved to be the director's busiest decade, as he dabbled in intense psycho-drama (Dangerous Game, The Blackout), gangster movies (The Funeral), sci-fi (Body Snatchers, New Rose Hotel) and horror (The Addiction). He continued to turn in little-seen but interesting work, such as the urban drug drama 'R Xmas and the religious allegory Mary until his higher profile returned with the likes of Welcome to New York and Pasolini.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: