HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Portal
Me You Madness
Reckoning, The
Laddie: The Man Behind the Movies
For the Sake of Vicious
Hell Bent
Straight Shooting
Jules Verne's Rocket to the Moon
Man They Could Not Hang, The
Final Days
Frightened City, The
Assimilate
Sequin in a Blue Room
Common Crime, A
Into the Labyrinth
Power, The
Wake of Death
Night Orchid
Mortal
Iron Mask, The
Dinosaur
Personal History of David Copperfield, The
Dove, The
Collective
Charulata
Minari
Violation
Defending Your Life
Champagne Murders, The
He Dreams of Giants
Lost in America
Take Back
Honeydew
Banishing, The
Drifters, The
Gushing Prayer
Escape from Coral Cove
Swan Princess, The
Shortcut
Stray
   
 
Newest Articles
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
   
 
  Death of a Corrupt Man Delon goes gunning for government corruption
Year: 1977
Director: Georges Lautner
Stars: Alain Delon, Ornella Muti, Stéphane Audran, Mireille Darc, Maurice Ronet, Michel Aumont, Klaus Kinski
Genre: Drama, Action, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Philippe (Maurice Ronet), a corrupt politician, is being blackmailed by the mysterious Serrano, who keeps a diary full of juicy details on several of France’s most prominent figures. When Serrano is murdered, Philippe panics and goes for help from his best friend Xavier (Alain Delon). Xavier provides Philippe with an alibi, covering his whereabouts on the night of the crime, and is entrusted with Serrano’s diary. Philippe is killed, alongside several other suspects, as sinister forces begin liquidating anyone involved in the Serrano affair. A host of gangsters, corrupt cops, and hitmen are after the diary, but Xavier is an ice-cool, super-skilled, ex-legionnaire. He outshoots, outruns and outfoxes the bad guys, and follows a trail leading to a femme fatale (Ornella Muti), Philippe’s drunken wife (Stéphane Audran), a homosexual businessman (Klaus Kinski), and eventually, the real killer.

Produced by Delon, this is one of the French superstar’s finest vehicles, a Gallic cousin to such conspiracy thrillers as The Parallax View (1974) and Three Days of the Condor (1975). One could argue it’s superior to either, since instead of vague conspiracy fantasies concocted by ambiguous bogeymen, this is a pointed attack upon government corruption and politics being conducted in Mafia style. However, some critics castigated the film as too reflective of Delon’s right-wing views, a shallow riposte to more ambitious, left-wing thrillers like Yves Boisset’s Le Juge Fayard Dit ‘Le Sheriff’ and Pierre Granier-Deferre’s Adieu, Poulet (1975) (which, like Death of a Corrupt Man was adapted from a novel by Jean Laborde).

Whatever your take on its political stance, there is no denying it is a cracking thriller. Lautner punctuates the film with tense confrontations and brutal violence, and orchestrates one, magnificently sustained car chase. Master cinematographer Henri Decae makes inspired use of chiaroscuro to convey a palpable atmosphere of menace and dread. This being a Delon production, our hero gets to tangle with no less than three Euro beauties: sultry Ornella Muti, slinky Mireille Darc, and sly Stéphane Audran. Muti makes a striking, tragic heroine, but Darc and Audran are rather wasted in nondescript roles. Klaus Kinski fares considerably better, in a small but – for him – comparatively sympathetic part.

Centre of it all remains Alain Delon, commanding the screen with another variation on his “indestructible charmer” persona, established way back in Jean-Pierre Melville’s Le Samurai (1967). Less vulnerable than characters played by Warren Beatty and Robert Redford in similar thrillers, Delon is more a righteous superhero, standing up for the underdog and socking it to the corrupt power brokers in city hall. We wouldn’t want it any other way.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 5298 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Stately Wayne Manor
   

 

Last Updated: