HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  All This and World War II Give Peace A Chance
Year: 1976
Director: Susan Winslow
Stars: Various
Genre: Musical, War, DocumentaryBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: To the strains of the Beatles song "Magical Mystery Tour" but not performed by them as Ambrosia are doing it instead, the footage begins, scenes of the nineteen-thirties in Nazi Germany where Adolf Hitler is amassing his forces. World War II is brewing, and before you know what's happening, the Nazis are advancing across Europe and the battles have begun... and set to the music of the most famous band ever to emerge from Britain. But only in cover version form.

If that sounds like a stupid idea, I don't know if setting the war footage to the originals would have been any better. As a way to sell a compilation album, there have been more inspired notions, but few as strange and likely to prompt the pressing question, "What were they thinking?" Sticking with newsreels sprinkled with the odd bit of contemporary film, as well as movie clips made after when there's a frustrating lack of newsreel to go around, All This and World War II is one long montage, and needless to say the songs are not really performed more satisfyingly than the Fab Four did originally.

At times the connections between the tunes and what they're paired with are crushingly obvious, to say the least. Hitler is "The Fool on the Hill", as Helen Reddy tells us, and Benito Mussolini, later on when things aren't going his way, is the "Nowhere Man" according to Jeff Lynne. Is Leo Sayer's rendering of "The Long and Winding Road" improved any by the booms of shells exploding and bombs falling? Is "Sun King" trilled by the Bee Gees as the Japanese aeroplanes fly to Pearl Harbor in poor taste? Come to think of it, how does any of this ennoble the fighting of those six years?

Well, it doesn't really, and the producers apparently believed that the Beatles' sounds would be more fittingly presented with plaintive strings and self-important brass at every turn. Elton John's "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" is probably the most recognisable cover here, but even that is somewhat lacklustre, despite having John Lennon on guitar. Mainly you cringe at the choices of artists, whether it's Frankie Valli giving us his "A Day in the Life" or an act that must have been pretty obscure even then belting out yet another number.

If you didn't know much about World War II, then I'm not sure how helpful this film would be, as events fly by as if to pack in as much of the history as possible. However, the most glaring omission has to be the utter lack of mention of the Holocaust: perhaps even this project thought it too much of a stretch to enhance concentration camp images with Lennon and Paul McCartney songs? But why Lennon and McCartney at all? They didn't have any obvious connection to the tragedies, but maybe as the Beatles were meaningful to the younger generation of the day, it was hoped that their music would attract them to the significance of the Second World War. In effect, it's misguided at best, yet strangely compelling.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 6371 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: