HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
1 chance sur 2
Betterman
Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
Yin Yang Master, The
Hail, Mafia!
Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase
Mirai
Strange House, The
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Freebie and the Bean Buddy Buddy
Year: 1974
Director: Richard Rush
Stars: Alan Arkin, James Caan, Loretta Swit, Jack Kruschen, Mike Kellin, Paul Koslo, Linda Marsh, John Garwood, Alex Rocco, Valerie Harper, Christopher Morley, Bruce Mackey, Monty Stickles, Chuck Bail, Eddy Donno, Robert Harris, Whitey Hughes
Genre: Comedy, Action, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Freebie (James Caan) and Bean (Alan Arkin) are two plainclothes cops in San Francisco who tonight are currently emptying garbage into the back of their car. There is a good reason for their actions, which is the evidence they are searching for that will bring down a local, corrupt businessman called Myers (Jack Kruschen), and lo and behold, torn up into a number of pieces is exactly the kind of note they have sought. However, after trying and failing to track down another criminal who may be involved, and as usual not being proud about how they go about assembling their case - violence and threats being mandatory - they are brought in by the D.A. (Alex Rocco) who tells them they can't get their arrest warrant until early next week. This is unfortunate, as Myers has a contract out on his head, and may not survive the next few days...

Until The Blues Brothers came along at the start of the next decade, one of the films that seemed to sum up the feeling of the comedy action genre being nothing more than excuse for lamebrained and wanton destruction was Freebie and the Bean, and the Blues Brothers weren't even cops as our heroes here were. Scripted by Robert Kaufman from executive producer Floyd Mutrux's story, the whole production appeared to be an attempt to pack in as much violence, shouting and, shall we say, broad humour as possible as we were encouraged to revel in the good guys' bad behaviour. Luckily, in the shape of Arkin and Caan, director Richard Rush had a great double act to wring the laughs from material that was unpromising on paper.

The epitome of the buddy picture, this film set a template that has lasted to this day with any number of mismatched law enforcers gracing our screens both large and small. It's not the plotline that's important, indeed it's pretty difficult to follow in this, it's the setpieces and the love-hate relationship between its protagonists that really matters. The bigoted, devil may care Freebie and the uptight, supposedly Mexican Bean (Arkin as a Mexican?) are perfectly suited to one another, if only they could admit it to themselves they could settle down with each other and start a famliy. As it is, they have to remain abrasive, with such scenes as Freebie yanking the buttons off Bean's shirt to demonstrate how cheap it is depicting this.

And then there's the action, which takes the form of chases in their car (whatever their latest model is after the last one has been trashed) and chases on foot, the more destructive the better. These sequences are well handled by Rush, and not as repetitive as the antagonistic character interplay, with the pursuit that ends with the police car smashing into the side of a third floor apartment and the motorcycle chase standing out (although the stunt doubles aren't exactly well hidden). Yet when you get right down to it, Freebie and Bean are idiots, it's a miracle they don't kill innocent bystanders, and when we see them fire a hail of bullets into a toilet cubicle they believe is holding a hitman we realise they are dangerous. In fact, it's difficult to see whose side Rush is on, as the others, authorities and criminals both, are not especially sympathetic either and it's only their sense of humour that allows us to warm to the bumbling lawmen of the title. Music by Dominic Frontiere.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 6403 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Richard Rush  (1930 - )

Cult American director who never quite made the most of his talents, mainly due to circumstances beyond his control. He spent the 1960s working on exploitation films of increasing stature, some of which have become cult favourites, such as Hells Angels on Wheels, Psych-Out and The Savage Seven, until he gained recognition with counterculture drama Getting Straight. The 1970s followed with one other film, buddy cop comedy Freebie and the Bean, until in 1980 The Stunt Man, which many consider his best work, was released. After that he had just one more credit, for unintentional laugh fest thriller The Color of Night. His fans wish Rush had enjoyed more creative opportunities.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Enoch Sneed
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: