HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Letter from Paris
Behind the Mask
Lucky
Matrix, The
Undergods
Betrayed
Fried Barry
Once Upon a River
Cowboys
Atlantis
We Still Say Grace
Enfant Terrible
Nomadland
Playboy of the Western World, The
Bike Thief, The
Threshold
Virtuoso, The
Here are the Young Men
Beast Beast
Labyrinth of Cinema
Justice Society: World War II
Artist's Wife, The
Truman & Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation
Pusher III
Palm Springs
Devil Commands, The
Oak Room, The
Pusher II
Forget Everything and Run
Secrets & Lies
Red Moon Tide
Man with Nine Lives, The
Pusher
Pot Carriers, The
Black Bear
Don't Cry, Pretty Girls!
Portal
Me You Madness
Reckoning, The
Laddie: The Man Behind the Movies
   
 
Newest Articles
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
   
 
  Portal Shut That Door
Year: 2021
Director: Saman Kesh, Jeff Desom, Dugan O'Neal
Stars: Kathy Khanh, Julianne Collins, Aric Floyd, Rory Ann Dahl, Christopher Black, Josh Peck, Lina Esco, Dugan O'Neal, Bailee MyKell Cowperthwaite, Jordan Rock, Cru Ennis, Jordan David, Kyp Malone, Kristina Lear, Bira Vanara, Wilson Bethel, Darius Levante
Genre: Science Fiction, WeirdoBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: All across the world emergency services are receiving strange calls from citizens whose friends and family members are taking funny turns, wandering off into the night towards a series of portals, or so-called "doors", which have appeared mysteriously. Quite what is going on has escaped the globe, but it seems that when some people enter these doors they will never return, and their presence has created anomalies in sending birds falling from the sky and satellites crashing to the ground. As more and more people vanish into these apparitions, those left behind try to make sense of an environment that has gone completely haywire, from kids in school to explorers under instruction from the authorities to find out what they can...

Portal was originally called Doors, which could be confusing as it bears resemblance to an earlier science fiction movie from the same team named Portals (no "S" this time around). Possibly to prevent audience thinking, well, I've heard all I want to about Jim Morrison, there was a name change, but perhaps something a lot different could have been dreamt up when Portals was still available on many streaming platforms at the same time. Whatever, this confusion tended to obscure what was in effect a series of short films strung together, much in the same manner as this team's V/H/S anthology horrors, except Portal was a lot more sci-fi than anything intended to be frightening, though it appeared to be counting on the viewer growing unnerved.

It should be noted a news story around when this was being released was of the large collection of shiny, metal monoliths (for want of a better word) appearing in locations around the world, apparently a copycat prank akin to crop circles inspired by a never explained example which kicked off the craze in Utah, USA. There was nothing to indicate these had extraterrestrial origin, however, so the link to this film was probably a coincidence, and the doors did not look like those towers anyway. While the story's deliberately obscure nature rubbed a lot of people up the wrong way, as in real life, if you didn't mind getting few concrete answers to the questions of what was actually happening here, it was pretty good entertainment.

Best summed up as variations on a theme from three directors, it only really faltered in the finale, obviously shot during pandemic Lockdown as it consisted of an internet video call between two of the cast (in character). Before that we were offered the introductory tale of a group of high schoolers in a test who gradually twig there is a crisis occurring outside that is making its way inside, a group of scientists who put on spacesuits to traverse a portal in hope of investigating it, and much later, an amateur boffin who conducts his own experiments on a door in the forest, to the point of communication. With what? Some kind of alien intelligence, perhaps in the capacity of a god, you know the type of thing, science fiction has been pondering unknowable powers in the universe for decades.

And there was a pleasing sense of watching an old time genre anthology taken from the page to the screen about this. Although not huge budget, it was clear they were making the most of what they had to create an off-kilter world akin to our own shifted out of alignment with logic, and by simple use of many a trick in the indie sci-fi moviemakers' arsenal, like drone footage or clever set dressing and makeup, a genuinely strange mood was elicited. If it was not much more than a set of weird tales that asked you to be enthralled by its basic, curious stylings, if you were feeling on its wavelength there was quite a bit to appreciate, despite its scrappy quality that was smoothed over by the three directors evidently singing from the same hymn sheet. Oh, and religion was largely left out of it - it was the awe in the face of the cosmic that concerned us in this. Somewhat dubious decision to call a whole segment Knockers, on the other hand, which could well see it accused of false advertising. Music by John Beltran.

[Signature Entertainment presents Portal on Digital Platforms and DVD 19th April 2021.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 170 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: