HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
1 chance sur 2
Betterman
Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
Yin Yang Master, The
Hail, Mafia!
Nancy Drew and the Hidden Staircase
Mirai
Strange House, The
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Fukushima 50 It Costs A Bomb
Year: 2020
Director: Setsuro Wakamatsu
Stars: Ken Watanabe, Takumi Saito, Koicho Sato, Mark Chinnery, Tomoro Taguchi, Justin Leeper, Yasuko Tomita, Masane Tsukayama, Masako Hagiwara, Narumi Yasuda, Shiro Sano, Yuri Nakamura, Keisuke Horibe, Riho Yoshioka, Yuta Kanai, Hidetaka Yoshioka
Genre: HistoricalBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: March 2011, and in Japan the nuclear power station at Fukushima appears to be running perfectly until there are tremors and then a full-blown earthquake which cuts power significantly. The head of the plant, Masao Yoshida (Ken Watanabe), thinks he can cope with this upset and starts ordering his staff to limit the damage, but they have reckoned without the second wave of disaster: a literal wave, as a tsunami builds off the coast of the facility. Although the staff manage to escape too much injury, the buildings are not so lucky, and that includes those housing the reactors which are badly damaged when the electricity goes down. Now Yoshida must try to keep the reactors cool despite there being no obvious way to do so - and devastation is looming.

The Fukushima disaster was heard around the world, one which could have been a Japanese Chernobyl had it not been for the quick thinking of the plant's workers who made an already dangerous situation into one that did not escalate into the deaths of the local community, and even further afield. That the world was holding its breath as this went on did not escape the makers of this fictionalisation of the event, which funnily enough did have aspirations to be a Japanese Chernobyl, if you meant that miniseries about the Soviet-era calamity, though Fukushima 50 (named after the workers who saved the day) remained more relevant as a project to play to Japanese audiences rather than an item that would travel successfully around the globe.

Not that it was bad, it was more that its combination of patriotic cheerleading for the ordinary Japanese citizen and the ire it reserved for those in political authority would always be more relevant to the citizens of The Land of the Rising Sun - and true to form, this did end with an actual rising sun under the end credits. It was very broad in its delivery, with little room for subtlety, therefore not as satisfying as, say, The China Syndrome which was an obvious antecedent and was indeed referenced in the dialogue. That said, the media presence was largely ignored with Watanabe in the Jack Lemmon role, though meeting a different fate as we were told with not a shred of irony that his character, and more than that the man he was based upon, was nothing less than a true hero for his management of what could have been far worse.

Not that it was a walk in the park as it was, and there are still stories about the radiation damage emerging from that part of the world to this day. Director Setsuro Wakamatsu conjured up some appropriately harrowing imagery, such as the opening tidal wave, or the snow bringing with it a form of nuclear fallout to land on the town, though at times he was restricted by his budget and some of this was more at home with the sequences of tense conversations in offices and the control room than it was staging spectacle. Most of the blame went on the Government of the day, the unnamed Prime Minister portrayed as a ranting buffoon whose insistence on visiting the disaster area did more harm than good since they could only proceed once he had left for safety. As an account, this was tersely delivered until they could resist sentimentality no more, and with the strains of Danny Boy (?!) on the soundtrack, Wakamatsu aimed for the tear ducts, yet did not really succeed, something off a misstep to close. It was generous to the Americans, however, even with the atomic bomb allusions. Taro Iwashiro provided the music.

[Available on the Altitude.film website. Click here to watch.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 880 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Enoch Sneed
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: