HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
Burning Sea, The
Godzilla Singular Point
Ace of Aces
Innocents, The
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound Noise Deploys
Year: 2019
Director: Midge Costin
Stars: Walter Murch, Ben Burtt, Gary Rydstrom, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Barbara Streisand, David Lynch, Robert Redford, Peter Weir, Hans Zimmer, Christopher Nolan, Ang Lee, Sofia Coppola, Mark A. Mangini, Cecelia Hall, Ryan Coogler, Anna Behlmer
Genre: DocumentaryBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: While everyone who enjoys films can call to mind their favourite images from their favourite films, calling to mind their favourite sound designs may be a different matter. Sure, they can recall a piece of music and how well it was wedded to those images, but what of the sound effects, the ambient noise, how the noise creates a feeling of movement, and so on? Possibly there are some where the effects are brought to mind, and even more possibly that film will be 1977's Star Wars and its sequels, for that brought together Walter Murch and Ben Burtt, whose manufactured sounds contributed hugely to the overall impact: what would the franchise be without the sound of a light sabre or a TIE Fighter? Where would Chewbacca be without his voice?

Or R2-D2 without his bleeps and bloops? As is pointed out in director Midge Costin and scripter Bobette Buster's documentary, the soundtrack is half the movie experience. This seems to be stating the bloody obvious, but with a host of well-chosen clips and sympathetic interviewees you will come away from Making Waves with plenty more respect for those technical wizards, which was of course the point of the exercise. This was strictly Hollywood we were talking about, so it was rare to hear a non-American accent throughout the ninety minutes or so it took for this to unfold, but as it was Hollywood that blazed a trail for the craft, you could forgive them that, and it was an American film after all. Costin knew of which she spake: she was a sound editor of many years' experience.

She started with Cannon back in the eighties before blockbuster work in the nineties, or became established midway through the eighties at least, which may have you wondering if she had seen Mark Hartley's documentary on that notorious studio and this had inspired her to make something similar: their format was very much the same, though there were not quite as many laughs or outrageous stories in this. It was closer to a primer for the uninitiated than it was an in-depth scrutiny of the subject matter, but even so hearing those anecdotes from those who were there when great developments were being made was always going to be entertaining, despite Star Wars fans having heard a lot of it before. There was something of the history lesson about how it was structured, starting way back with Thomas Edison's first recordings.

It then explained how synchronised sound was developed, famously with speech in The Jazz Singer in 1927, and how Hollywood studios came to rely on the same effects and cues to use in all their films; King Kong's unsung sound hero Murray Spivak was offered due respect here as the true pioneer in 1933. Then we move forward to the seventies where directors George Lucas and Francis Ford Coppola understand how important the sound of their movies is, Barbara Streisand demands that her 1976 A Star is Born remake has to have stereo recording that becomes an industry standard, and Gary Rydstrom arrives in the eighties to shake up the technology with digital sound. It also touched on the inclusion of female technicians, though perhaps surprisingly, mostly in passing, and broke down the main facets of the work that goes in to constructing a soundtrack; it was nice to see David Lynch's collaborator Alan Splet paid tribute to, as much a pioneer as the more famous names. Really film documentaries have to avoid the temptation to look like an extended DVD extra, and Making Waves does not quite manage that, but it does entertain and have you thinking about the next movie you watch. Music by Allyson Newman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1776 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: