HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Don't Breathe 2
Closing Time
Cryptozoo
Weathering with You
Rim of the World
Love & Basketball
JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time
Trapped
We Need to Do Something
Falbalas
Vanguard
A-X-L
Injustice
Bigfoot Hunters
Armitage III: Polymatrix
Girls Nite Out
Moxie!
Five Women for the Killer
Dolce Vita, La
Pig
I Am Belmaya
Lodger, The
Show, The
Beta Test, The
Medium, The
John and the Hole
Survivalist, The
Ape Woman, The
Black Widow
Cop Secret
Dark Eyes of London, The
V/H/S/94
Fay Grim
Night of the Animated Dead
Freshman Year
Escape Room: Tournament of Champions
Anne at 13,000 Ft.
Even Mice Belong in Heaven
Death Screams
Freakscene: The Story of Dinosaur Jr.
   
 
Newest Articles
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
   
 
  Fifth Cord, The From Zero To Nero
Year: 1971
Director: Luigi Bazzoni
Stars: Franco Nero, Silvia Monti, Wolfgang Preiss, Ira von Fürstenberg, Edmund Purdom, Rossella Falk, Renato Romano, Guido Alberti, Luciano Bartoli, Agostina Belli, Corrada Gaipa, Andrea Scotti, Luigi Antonio Guerra, Irio Fantini, Pamela Tiffin
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Andrea Bild (Franco Nero) is a reporter for a newspaper in Rome, where he is often found nursing a bottle of whisky rather than with his head buried in a news story, as he does tonight, though at least he has the excuse of currently attending a New Year's celebration. While there is still dancing going on, the party is winding down which suits him fine, he would rather keep drinking until oblivion found him than socialise, though he does raise his glass to anyone who occasionally meets his eyeline. But what he does not know is that among the revellers is a man who has grown obsessed with one thought which runs through his mind incessantly: the thought telling him to kill.

Luigi Bazzoni was never going to be one of the top flight directors of Italian giallo, his filmography was simply too meagre for that accolade, though that is not to say he was worth dismissing out of hand, for his sense of the visual was so strong that you may have wished he had applied himself more. Maybe he wanted to be taken more seriously as an artist and considered this sort of thing beneath him, or perhaps he was determined to elevate the genre with his aesthetic style and that proved unpopular with producers, but whatever the reason, his output amounted to a slender number of well-designed movies that nevertheless are rarely brought up when discussing greats.

Of course, there would be no The Fifth Cord without the work of Dario Argento, whose hit thriller The Bird with the Crystal Plumage had made waves the year before this, and had the Italian industry in its copycat inclinations producing a mass of gialli for the rest of the nineteen-seventies. That said, Argento did not invent the form, and you could look to Mario Bava as the true godfather of that decade's horror-thrillers with Blood and Black Lace in the mid-sixties, one of his supremely stylish endeavours that had certainly inspired Argento just as surely as Dario spawned so many imitators. On the other hand, given the way Italian cinema was going, would it not have created these anyway?

It was more as if this was an idea whose time had come, and if Argento and Bava had not popularised them, someone else would have come along and kicked the craze off themselves. Whether that director would have been Bazzoni is a matter of conjecture, but doubtful, yes, he certainly had the ability to craft striking imagery and a nasty way with staging a murder, if not a leering one, but he was more likely to have been an also-ran when efforts like this and his later, even weirder, giallo Footprints, were too keen to plough their own oddball furrow than stick to the path set out by others in the technique. Still, he did bring something of substance to the table, which may have you lamenting his other work was either so hard to find or simply non-existent.

The plot was basic stuff, Nero, whose unforced charisma was well in evidence here, investigated the increasing number of murders while in danger of becoming a suspect himself when he appears to have connections to the deceased. It was pleasingly twisty, but nothing to get too enthused about unless you fancied a little star spotting, from regulars like hard faced Rossella Falk here as a woman paralysed from the waist down which makes her easy to attack, in a cruel development, to more rarely glimpsed celebrities like Pamela Tiffin as Bild's girlfriend, she having abandoned Hollywood and set up in Europe, as many performers did in those days. But really you watched this because almost every frame was worth, well, framing, the approach to the architecture of a refurbished Rome making it look cold and uninviting yet somehow hard to turn away from. You were thinking, what could this guy do with a real quality script, but that answer would have to go unanswered. Music by Ennio Morricone, who offers loungecore, jazz freakout and church organ in almost equal measure.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 929 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: