HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
True Don Quixote, The
Babymother
Mitchells vs. the Machines, The
Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Unholy, The
How to Deter a Robber
Antebellum
Offering, The
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  Meg, The X Sharks The Spot
Year: 2018
Director: Jon Turteltaub
Stars: Jason Statham, Li Bing Bing, Rainn Wilson, Cliff Curtis, Winston Chau, Shuya Sophia Cai, Ruby Rose, Page Kennedy, Robert Taylor, Ólafur Darri Ólafsson, Jessica McNamee, Masi Oka, Raymond Vinten, Mai Hongmei, Yi Wei, Vithaya Pansringarm
Genre: Horror, Action, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Five years ago there was a deep sea tragedy involving explorer and submersible pilot Jonas Taylor (Jason Statham) where to save the crew of a downed submarine, he was forced to sacrifice some lives to ensure everyone else survived. The problem was, Jonas was blamed for that incident ever since, despite the fact there was nothing he could have done to rescue those who died, but the shame has hung over his head from that day to this. However, he could have a chance to redeem himself as an expedition to the deepest trench of the oceans has hit a major snag: will he be able to get the crew of a submersible out before... something rather large chomps on them for good?

The Meg was a film in production hell ever since the rights to Steve Alten's novel of the same name was published, the first in a series (so someone at the studio must have been thinking, "Ooh, please be a franchise"). After nearly getting made at least twice, maybe more, Jon Turteltaub was hired not to craft the R-rated horror the fans might have wished for, but a more friendly PG-13 that would snare a larger audience: seeing as how the money they spent on this was astronomical, they had to be certain they would make a profit. Even with that cautiousness in mind, there was by no means any guarantee this would make its money back, never mind double it, what it needed.

Yet somehow the thought of Jason Statham punching a giant shark proved irresistible to the global audience, and this American-Chinese production with an international cast was a huge success in spite of the number of grumbles it generated both critically and with certain sections of the audience. This was essentially one of those apparent billions of man-eating shark movies, quite a number of them having been manufactured on a tiny fraction of the budget that The Meg had at its disposal. By this stage, "Shark" had become synonymous with "Cheapo CGI horror flick that never sees the inside of a cinema", another reason many believed this was a profligate folly.

On watching it, no, it was nowhere near the rich experience that Steven Spielberg's Jaws was, that blockbuster basically the only reason shark horrors were a thing, but The Meg was proof the seventies classic need not have been as smart and suspenseful as it was: they could have released something a lot more like Jaws 2 and it would have struck the right nerve and rung the box office tills almost as loudly. This 2018 descendent was never going to be mentioned in the same reverent manner as the original Jaws, yet it was entertaining once you noticed everyone in the film spoke in poster taglines for a greater proportion of their dialogue and you began to take bets in your mind as to which of them were megalodon fodder and which would survive the onslaught of a giant fishy predator.

Actually for the first half hour this hewed closer to the oceanographical thrills of a more famous flop, James Cameron's The Abyss from 1989; that would-be blockbuster never found a sufficient audience back then, but did spawn a shortlived craze for cash-ins on a work that didn't make much of a profit anyway. Director Turteltaub's efforts here were a lot slicker than those older knock-offs, but the principle was the same, and while The Abyss had to content itself with a cult following, The Meg went ballistic. That rare megabudget co-production between Hollywood and China that genuinely clicked with audiences across the board, the attraction was of a fairly rough and ready variety summed up in its leading man; he had appeared in big hits before, but as a lead this was proof he could carry a movie even if most were over halfway interested because of the titular creature that is brought up from its prehistoric lair to cause trouble, with initial reservations about killing it thrown overboard once it starts a-munching. It won you over in its daftness, yet was played surprisingly straight. Music by Harry Gregson-Williams (really needing a proper theme for the shark).
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1277 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: