HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Furnace, The
Tyrel
Iceman
Blue Sky
Tokyo Dragon Chef
Pittsburgh
12 Hour Shift
Intergalactic Adventures of Max Cloud, The
Spoilers, The
Killer Therapy
Man Upstairs, The
Bloodhound, The
New Mutants, The
Tesla
Flame of New Orleans, The
Ham on Rye
Imperial Blue
Tenet
August 32nd on Earth
Don is Dead, The
Seven Sinners
Body of Water
Away
Soul
About Endlessness
Let It Snow
Ava
Deliver Us from Evil
Shark Attack 3: Megalodon
Midnight Sky, The
Lego Star Wars Holiday Special, The
Mon Oncle Antoine
Blast of Silence
Blackout, The
Stars in Your Eyes
Alone
Climate of the Hunter
Farewell Amor
Let's Scare Julie
Okko's Inn
   
 
Newest Articles
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
Blood Wedding: The Bride with White Hair on Blu-ray
The Inhuman Element: The Ladykillers on 4K UHD
As You Like It, Baby: Breathless on Blu-ray
Stargazing: Light Entertainment Rarities on DVD
Down to the Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 2 on DVD
Herding Cats: Sleepwalkers on Blu-ray
Confessions of a Porn Star: Adult Material on DVD
   
 
  Teen Titans Go! To the Movies Gonna Make You A Star
Year: 2018
Director: Aaron Horvath, Peter Rida Michail
Stars: Greg Cipes, Scott Menville, Khary Payton, Tara Strong, Hynden Walch, Will Arnett, Kristen Bell, Michael Bolton, Nicolas Cage, Greg Davies, John DiMaggio, Halsey, Tom Kenny, Jimmy Kimmel, Stan Lee, Patton Oswalt, Fred Tatasciore, Lil Yachty, Will Wheaton
Genre: Comedy, Action, Animated, Science Fiction, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Balloon Man (voiced by Greg Davies) has unleashed his awesome power of inflatability on the city, and has his sights set on robbing the banks in the area, that is until he meets his match. On throwing police cars about, he is stopped in his tracks as the vehicles are suspended in mid-air, then safely placed on the ground: the Teen Titans are here, and begin to use their powers and abilities on him with incredible effect. Well, they make it sound like he's farting, anyway. There's only one problem, though, he doesn't know who they are, he thinks they're minor Justice League members, and when the Teens do their rap to set him right, the real League appears and foils Balloon Man decisively.

As you may have gathered from the above introduction, Teen Titans Go! To the Movies was irreverent almost to a fault, a spoofy take on superhero movies that, as with every spoofy take on superheroes, had to abide by the rules of the genre nevertheless. But the filmmakers made this a virtue of the cartoon, leading those who had been irritated by the original television series it was based on grudgingly admitting it was pretty funny, and those who were won over already affirmed in their delight that directors Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail had succeeded so admirably in building on the sense of humour that had marked out the small screen incarnation.

Fans being fans, there remained grumbles in that there was a contingent who had really enjoyed the previous version of the Teen Titans, and were aggrieved when it was effectively cancelled for this version, which pitched both younger, with cutesy designs and juvenile gags, and to the older toon appreciator who enjoyed the more grown-up references the creators smuggled in, and that included the jokes that would go over the heads of the little ones. This was more or less the approach in To the Movies, a meta style that was not unknown to Marvel fans of Deadpool, yet as it was a kids' animation this was able to be more inclusive and didn't need to pander with the violent content.

Really, you would have to be either so sick of superhero movies that you had had them up to here, or a megafan of the original Teen Titans toon to be incensed by what was concocted in the name of entertainment when Robin (Scott Menville) decides his heart's desire is a movie of his own - which is what we were watching, just to bend the brain a tad if you started to think about this too hard. Accompanied by his cohorts Beast Boy (Greg Cipes), Cyborg (Khary Payton from The Walking Dead), Raven (toon legend Tara Strong) and Starfire (Hynden Walch, Princess Bubblegum herself), he sets out to make things better for his team since every other superhero is getting their own silver screen outing, and after being refused admittance to Batman's new blockbuster premiere when every other DC superhero was there, the theme was getting taken seriously.

Obviously that was central to the plot because the tots who were clamouring to see this would have trouble being taken seriously themselves, at least for their bigger dreams, but it was also an opportunity to take apart the genre in a way that was a lot friendlier than Deadpool, and almost more sly as well. The main antagonist was Deathstroke (Will Arnett, also a producer - and also Lego Batman), who the Ryan Reynolds character was ripped off from (oh, my mistake, he was a parody, so that's all right then), just one example of the savvy that went into an extremely comics literate movie that had no real reason to be keen to dip into so much of the history of the medium. Not that anybody but an expert would be able to identify every character represented, in the background as well as the foreground, but it added a depth to what could have been shallow, while simultaneously making fun of a shallowness Robin was devoting himself to. If self-referential was its default mode, it was frequently hilarious, with a classic final line. Music by Jared Faber.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2113 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
Paul Smith
  Lee Fiveash
   

 

Last Updated: