HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Yes, God, Yes
Five Graves to Cairo
You've Been Trumped Too
Woman in Black, The
Elvis: That's the Way It Is
Man Who Laughs, The
Watch List
Giraffe
Kat and the Band
Echo
Perfect 10
Octaman
Red Penguins
China Syndrome, The
Babyteeth
Round-Up, The
Around the Sun
Once There Was Brasilia
Peripheral
Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street
Ice
She Demons
Good Girls, The
Hail, Hero!
Faces in the Crowd
Tamango
Traitor, The
Tomorrow
Third Generation, The
Saxon Charm, The
Spy Intervention
Moonrise
Mulan
Killer with a Thousand Eyes, The
Vigil, The
Liberation of L.B. Jones, The
Wizard of Baghdad, The
Ride
Good Manners
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
   
 
Newest Articles
What Use is Grief to a Horse? Equus on Blu-ray
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights in with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
Country Matters: Further Out of Town on Blu-ray
Bat-Damn: Was Joel Schumacher's Batman Really That Bad?
The Beat Goes On: Takeshi Kitano Collection on Blu-ray
Dream Treats: Scorsese Shorts on Blu-ray
It's Only Money: Laughter in Paradise on Blu-ray
A Regular Terpsichore: Dance, Girl, Dance on Blu-ray
Teenage Trauma: Baby Love on Blu-ray
The Happening: Pet Shop Boys It Couldn't Happen Here on Blu-ray
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
   
 
  I Think We're Alone Now Splendid Isolation
Year: 2018
Director: Reed Morano
Stars: Peter Dinklage, Elle Fanning, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Paul Giamatti
Genre: Science FictionBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Now the rest of the human race has been wiped out, Del (Peter Dinklage) can have the peace he always craved. But he also has a tidy mind, what with being a librarian and all, so when he is not catching up with his reading - all those wonderful books to lose himself in - he refers to the map of the town where he lives and crosses off the homes he has visited to clear away the bodies and bury them, then clean up their houses as a mark of respect - or is he simply making sure there will eventually be no trace of those he once shared the world with? However, one night he is in for a surprise when he notices the sky light up in the distance with fireworks...

The director here, Reed Morano, was interesting because of their past in cinematography; there was nothing unusual in a female director in the early twenty-first century even if they were not as numerous as the male ones still, but a woman as director of photography was a note of interest, though she shrugged off any notion that she was doing anything other than a job she had a talent for. I Think We're Alone Now was her second film at the helm after a lot of credits for her camerawork, and her experience on hit television series The Handmaid's Tale saw her in good stead for what amounted to another grim tale of the future, albeit post-apocalyptic here.

We do not really find out what happened to the rest of humanity, but it doesn't matter that much when Del is living in the present and even looking to the future in what may be a lonely existence, but loneliness is what suits him. Dinklage had played an isolated little man before in one of his breakthrough roles The Station Agent, and if there's one type of person cinema likes to interrupt when they are innocently going about their business it's the solitary character, whose essential blank slate is practically begging for filmmakers to scrawl on. So it was here, as screenwriter Mike Makowsky invented reasons to mess up Del's preferred belief that he was special in his uniqueness.

Unique? Nothing of the kind, it didn't matter that almost everyone else was dead, there was always going to be someone to invite themselves to your party for one, and here it was Elle Fanning as Grace who Del, surrendering to his curiosity, goes and finds after seeing those fireworks. She is inert when he stumbles across her in a car, but not deceased, merely needing wounds tended to and rest to bring her back to full strength, but that's not enough for her as while he would prefer she carries on her way, she is more keen to be part of his life, it is implied because whatever happened to her before is too traumatic to contemplate and even an existence played out with a diminutive grump is preferable to that. Naturally, that past is about to catch up with her in a way that Del's humdrum one will not.

There was a literary feel to much of I Think We're Alone Now, and definitely not a pop ditty tradition its title curiously invokes and does nothing with (a more pretentious moniker would have been preferable - Wild-Eyed Loner at the Gates of Oblivion, something like that). Morano's way with a camera was exemplary, as you might expect, bringing out the otherworldliness of a society that not so long ago had been teeming with lives by regularly shooting Dinklage and Fanning in silhouette with the light source in front of them, a neat trick that crafted an eerie atmosphere. While for the most part this explored the satisfaction of crossing off boxes that the type of person who likes to impose order on the disordered can enjoy, and how fragile that contentment can be, not a huge amount happened for most of the running time until they remembered they better include more plot, which introduced a sixties sci-fi dystopia posing as utopia element that kind of worked out if you didn't mind that it was silly and involved unnecessary murder as a narrative full stop. Oddly pleasing in its way, though. Music by Adam Taylor.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 765 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: