HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
1917
Tree House, The
Sputnik
Seducao da Carne
Yes, God, Yes
Five Graves to Cairo
You've Been Trumped Too
Woman in Black, The
Elvis: That's the Way It Is
Man Who Laughs, The
Watch List
Giraffe
Kat and the Band
Echo
Perfect 10
Octaman
Red Penguins
China Syndrome, The
Babyteeth
Round-Up, The
Around the Sun
Once There Was Brasilia
Peripheral
Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street
Ice
She Demons
Good Girls, The
Hail, Hero!
Faces in the Crowd
Tamango
Traitor, The
Tomorrow
Third Generation, The
Saxon Charm, The
Spy Intervention
Moonrise
Mulan
Killer with a Thousand Eyes, The
Vigil, The
Liberation of L.B. Jones, The
   
 
Newest Articles
What Use is Grief to a Horse? Equus on Blu-ray
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights in with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
Country Matters: Further Out of Town on Blu-ray
Bat-Damn: Was Joel Schumacher's Batman Really That Bad?
The Beat Goes On: Takeshi Kitano Collection on Blu-ray
Dream Treats: Scorsese Shorts on Blu-ray
It's Only Money: Laughter in Paradise on Blu-ray
A Regular Terpsichore: Dance, Girl, Dance on Blu-ray
Teenage Trauma: Baby Love on Blu-ray
The Happening: Pet Shop Boys It Couldn't Happen Here on Blu-ray
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
   
 
  Black Veil for Lisa, A Take my wife, please take my wife
Year: 1968
Director: Massimo Dallamano
Stars: John Mills, Luciana Paluzzi, Robert Hoffmann, Renate Kasché, Tullio Altamura, Carlo Hinterman, Enzo Fiermonte, Loris Bazzocchi, Jimmy il Fenomeno, Paola Natale, Mirella Pamphili, Vanna Polverosi, Rodolfo Licari, Bernardino Solitari, Carlo Spadoni
Genre: Horror, Sex, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: A black-gloved killer commits a string of murders seemingly connected to a drug ring operating in Hamberg, Germany. Dogged narcotics detective Inspector Franz Bulon (John Mills) is on the case but has other things on his mind. Chiefly his voluptuous young wife Lisa (Luciana Paluzzi) whom he suspects is having an affair. Lisa's consistent assurances to the contrary fail to pacify Bulon's paranoid mind. He takes to trailing her every move and eventually does not like what he finds. Meanwhile smooth-talking professional killer Max Lindt (Robert Hoffmann) blows his cool on realizing he left his lucky silver dollar behind at the scene of his last murder. Sure enough this vital clue leads Bulon right to Max's door. Yet to Max's surprise, rather than arrest him, a vengeful Bulon strikes a murderous deal...

Yes John Mills, among the most cosily British actors, made a lurid Italian giallo thriller. Not only that but with Massimo Dallamano, the cinematographer-turned-director who went on to helm the stylishly sleazy schoolgirls-in-peril classics What Have You Done to Solange? (1971) and What Have They Done to Your Daughters? (1974). Mills - a solid, dependable lead who never gave a bad performance - is here suitably grim-faced and tortured in an atypical role, portraying a man riddled with doubt and suspicion. A Black Veil for Lisa (released in Italy as La morte non ha sesso, which translates as 'Death Has No Sex' (come again?)) really interweaves two stories in one: the hunt for a killer connected to organized crime and the story of a man whose paranoia leads to vengeance and murder. It is a novel if uneasy mix wherein Inspector Bulon wavers back and forth from tragic, sympathetic hero to brooding, hectoring would-be murderer.

With a steady if plodding pace this ranks among Dallamano's talkier films. Nonetheless he exhibits his customary keen grasp of suspense mechanics and psychological undertones and knows his way around a stylish image. Prowling P.O.V. shots create an ominous mood (aided by a soundtrack sporadically hissing Lisa's name) with slick imagery straight out of a pulp paperback cover, be it the killer's giallo-regulation shiny black leather gloves or Luciana Paluzzi's sensual entrance in a diaphanous nightgown. Despite flashes of giallo style the plot, co-written by Dallamano, Audrey Nohra, Vittoriano Petrilli and Giuseppe Belli (based on a story by Belli), is grounded in realism and strikes a tone midway between French psychological thrillers and the more sober examples of the German krimi. Unlike Dallamano's later What Have They Done to Your Daughters?, A Black Veil for Lisa leans a little too heavily towards dry police procedural to engage giallo fans expecting sleazy thrills and gore.

Midway through the film pulls a Hitchcockian reversal of expectations and turns into a variation on Dial M for Murder (1954). The third act strains credibility and features some faintly cringe-worthy romantic banter although a few steamy scenes may satiate fans of former Thunderball (1965) Bond girl Paluzzi or indeed tanned torso-ed Robert Hoffmann. Interestingly although Hoffmann, very much the poor man's Alain Delon, is established as a cool, calculating killer, his character ultimately proves as hapless and vulnerable as everyone else in the movie. Among the leads Paluzzi's Lisa is the hardest to fathom, either under-characterized or drawn with deliberate ambiguity as part of the film's cynical portrait of marriage as a prison. Suspicion and mistrust drive a wedge between a couple who to be honest seem incompatible from the outset. The lack of any sympathetic characters at all renders a certain inevitability to proceedings and the film grinds laboriously to a dour fade-out established in the opening scene. Music by Richard Markowitz including a fairly haunting theme although the original Italian version is scored by Gianfranco Reverberi.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 1740 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: