HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Miserables, Les
Ritz, The
Patrick
Cemetery
Girls of the Sun
Princess and the Goblin, The
Skyfire
Upright
Incredible Kung Fu Mission
Dirty Cops
You Cannot Kill David Arquette
Leap of Faith: William Friedkin on The Exorcist
Son's Room, The
Evil Hits Evil
Agency
Blue My Mind
Thumbelina
Proxima
Aprile
Assassination Nation
Golden Key, The
Image Book, The
On Body and Soul
Unhinged
Eyewitness
Girlfriends
Danger Within
Rent-A-Pal
Battle in Outer Space
H-Man, The
Painted Bird, The
Finding Steve McQueen
Ropes
Five Easy Pieces
Peninsula
Nuclear
Queen of Hearts
Chinese Evil Technique
Primal
3 and a Half Kung Fu Girls
   
 
Newest Articles
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
Blood Wedding: The Bride with White Hair on Blu-ray
The Inhuman Element: The Ladykillers on 4K UHD
As You Like It, Baby: Breathless on Blu-ray
Stargazing: Light Entertainment Rarities on DVD
Down to the Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 2 on DVD
Herding Cats: Sleepwalkers on Blu-ray
Confessions of a Porn Star: Adult Material on DVD
They're Still Not Sure It is a Baby: Eraserhead on Blu-ray
Werewolves are Real: Dog Soldiers on Digital
Rose: A Love Story - Producers April Kelley and Sara Huxley Interview
Phone Phreak: 976-EVIL on Blu-ray
Living the Nightmare: Dementia on Blu-ray
Becky and The Devil to Pay: Ruckus and Lane Skye Interview
Big Top Bloodbath: Circus of Horrors on Blu-ray
A Knock on the Door at 4 O'clock in the Morning: The Strangers on Blu-ray
Wives of the Skies: Honey Lauren Interview
To Catch a Thief: After the Fox on Blu-ray
Tackling the Football Film: The Arsenal Stadium Mystery on Blu-ray
   
 
  Big T.N.T. Show, The Scream If You Wanna Go Louder
Year: 1966
Director: Larry Peerce
Stars: David McCallum, Ray Charles, Petula Clark, The Lovin' Spoonful, Bo Diddley, Joan Baez, The Ronettes, Roger Miller, The Byrds, Donovan Leitch, Ike Turner, Tina Turner, Phil Spector
Genre: MusicBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: It is late November 1965, and a selection of the biggest names in rock, soul, pop and folk have been assembled by producer Phil Spector to play before a live audience in what is hoped will be just as successful as the previous concert movie, The T.A.M.I. Show, and will go on to spawn a series of yearly occasions where music fans can attend vicariously by visiting their local picture palace to watch. The line-up is eclectic to say the least, so determined is the production to deliver something for every taste, but the audience are up for it and their enthusiasm should make for a memorable evening. All we need is for the host to arrive - ah, here he is, accompanied by four fez-sporting men in shades, and he takes to the stage to conduct the orchestra.

That host was David McCallum, the Scottish star who made his fortune playing a Russian on the then-newly launched hit The Man from U.N.C.L.E. television series, and thanks to that fresh fame he had embarked on a series of albums; not that he could sing, but he had classical training and arranged the music while often talking over the tracks, a sort of nineteen-sixties approach to making a record with a star who didn't have a great singing voice that you just don't get anymore. Nor do you get concert movies like this anymore, not with such a diverse number of acts on it, but that was the fashion in the middle of the decade, you would listen to everything portrayed as popular and played on the radio.

Yet we can see here a tipping point where that was about to change, for though the audience sits through Ray Charles as ecstatically as they do The Byrds, it was clear from a twenty-first century perspective this was not going to be the norm for much longer as music followers settled on one type of style to shower their adulation upon. Certainly television, rather than film, would remain a melting pot of differing genres, often on the same show, for some time afterwards, but eventually that everything but the kitchen sink method of assembling a roster of talent for a broadcast concert (this was created as if it were a television special, no matter that it was headed to theatres across America) was not one that survived other than the occasional pocket of entertainment.

What of that line-up? Though it was true to say this was the lesser sibling to The T.A.M.I. Show, that did not indicate it was worth dismissing. We saw many of the turns at their best, and this remained the best place to witness just how electrifying Bo Diddley or Ike and Tina Turner could be, those latter chosen to end the movie on a high, for the folkies did tend to bring the mood down significantly. Not terrible, but not what we expect from a rock concert from the sixties if you were unprepared for just how huge folk had become, though that was a peak that was only headed on a downward curve from this point on. Joan Baez may have had sensitive girls seen singing along silently when she performs, but her real highlight was where she trilled You've Lost That Loving Feeling while Spector and his orchestra accompanied her: it was odd enough to captivate.

Spector's pet project The Ronettes were a more conventional highlight, Ronnie powering through renditions of Be My Baby and the Isley Brothers' Shout and busting moves to go with her voice, in sharp contrast to Roger Miller up after, once seen as the future of country music his laidback eccentricity proves unexpectedly diverting (even if he does yell "HIPPY!" at an audience member, as if jokingly aware of how he was coming across). Petula Clark represented the British Invasion, with the audience in the palm of her hand as she offers Downtown, naturally, among other tunes, though Donovan was a more idiosyncratic booking, not blessed with many hits yet and going into folk overdrive with a version of Universal Soldier along with three others, put across to rapt silence - it was fascinating to watch the audience as much as the bands and singers. The Lovin' Spoonful's biggest hit here was Do You Believe in Magic, though they seem bemused to be screamed at, but Tina Turner probably stole the show, if it was to be stolen, as she roared her way through her appearance, a welcome reminder of how vital she was. This may sound all over the place, and maybe it was, but it was a great time capsule too.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1635 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: