HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Burnt Orange Heresy, The
Craft Legacy, The
Eye of the Storm
Inflatable Sex Doll of the Wastelands
Where No Vultures Fly
Come True
Kagemusha
Justine
Poly Styrene: I Am a Cliché
Madchen in Uniform
Fire Will Come
Suspect
Jailbreak Pact
News of the World
Dementer
Beyond Clueless
Stylist, The
Sky is On Fire, The
Wrong Turn
In a Year with 13 Moons
Blush
Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, The
Sinners, The
Tammy and the T-Rex
Archenemy
Zappa
Mindwarp
State Secret
Mogul Mowgli
Owners, The
Twentieth Century, The
Story of Gilbert and Sullivan, The
What Lies Below
Greenland
Broil
Dead Pigs
Willy's Wonderland
It's in the Air
School's Out Forever
Breeder
   
 
Newest Articles
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
   
 
  Corridors of Blood Knock Yourself Out
Year: 1958
Director: Robert Day
Stars: Boris Karloff, Betta St John, Christopher Lee, Finlay Currie, Adrienne Corri, Francis De Wolff, Francis Matthews, Frank Pettingel, Basil Dignam, Marian Spencer, Carl Bernard, John Gabriel, Nigel Green, Yvonne Romain, Howard Lang, Roddy Hughes
Genre: Horror, Drama, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: London 1840, before the invention of anaestheisia, and the bell begins to toll for assistance in an operation. Because every cut of the knife or saw of the blade is felt by every patient, it is necessary for them to be held down by some burly men, and so it is today when Doctor Bolton (Boris Karloff) is in surgery. He has a good reputation for speed, which is about the most the patients can hope for, but he yearns for a day when they need not feel the pain any longer, and often tells his fellow medical men that he is researching the correct chemical compound that will produce a gas to send the patients unconscious for the duration of the procedure. His colleagues think this is pie in the sky thinking, and tell him so, but for Bolton he feels this achievement is within his grasp, all he needs is further investigation...

Around the same time as Karloff was making The Haunted Strangler in Britain, the late nineteen-fifties, he also made this historical horror, though it suffered an ignominious fate compared to its sister production when its release was largely delayed for four years, by which time it was beginning to look out of date. The premise was a variation on the Burke and Hare efforts where the meeting of the medical fraternity and the criminal element led to all sorts of grimy ghastliness, only here the subject was not so much resurrection men but unsavoury souls like Christopher Lee's Resurrection Joe who bumps off his victims for money, though not necessarily to sell their corpses to science, indeed he looks as if he commits these crimes because he thoroughly enjoys himself doing it. This did mean the old guard represented by Karloff was meeting the new generation of fright flick stars with Lee.

This has offered Corridors of Blood a certain cachet among vintage horror fans thanks to the pairing of those two gentlemen, though in truth they did not share many scenes together and Lee may have been a newly minted star thanks to his Hammer movies, but in 1958 he simply received his own credit in the opening titles as if the producers were cottoning onto the fact they had a major new celebrity in this field who they had lucked into securing the services of. All that said, it was Karloff who was the leading man and Lee the glowering heavy, the second in command to Black Ben (Francis De Wolff) who owns a tavern where director Robert Day obviously instructed his extras to do the same thing in every scene set there: dancing and lots of it, added to a spot of snogging to offer that impression of decadence so we would fear for the terribly nice and kind Bolton as he descended into this lion's den.

Back home, he frets over his experiments as he tries nitrous oxide that works, but also sends him delirious; he attempts to subdue one patient who in a somewhat over the top reaction wakes up because he has not been given a strong enough dose, and proceeds to try and beat up all the students and doctors in the gallery, thus harming Bolton's schemes. Then the surgeon goes further when he tries tincture of opium, which also works, but all too well when he goes into a daze that foolishly sees him visit Black Ben's once again to worry after an ex-patient who wound up there before he was supposed to be released from hospital. While there, Bolton's notebook is pickpocketed and an opportunity for the rogues to blackmail him arises. So you see, there were some fears being played upon such as the horror of surgery and drug addiction, but also a class mistrust where the underdog Bolton meets the underclass at the tavern, yet for all that Corridors of Blood wasn't really a full-on shocker, it hewed closer to the historical drama or thriller, albeit with an entirely invented plotline. For all its genre muddiness, it was fairly well presented, and Karloff did his tragic thing once more to fine effect. Music by Buxton Orr.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1949 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
   

 

Last Updated: