HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Visit, The Help! The Aged!
Year: 2015
Director: M. Night Shyamalan
Stars: Olivia DeJonge, Ed Oxenbould, Deanna Dunagan, Peter McRobbie, Kathryn Hahn, Celia Keenan-Bolger, Samuel Stricklen, Patch Darragh, Jorge Cordova, Steve Annan, Benjamin Kanes
Genre: HorrorBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: We are watching a teenager's home movies where she interviews her mother (Kathryn Hahn) about her relationship with her own parents, which has been essentially non-existent for fifteen years. She explains that they disapproved of the man she fell in love with, who is the father of Becca (Olivia DeJonge) and Tyler (Ed Oxenbould), and when he eventually left their mother it broke off relations with the kids' grandparents. But now there is a chance for all that to mend, for they have gotten back in touch to invite them over, and since Becca believes some time away from their mother will give her the opportunity to nurture her new relationship with a boyfriend, she thinks it's a good idea.

But seeing as how we have just seen in the opening credits that this was directed by M. Night Shyamalan, you as a viewer might disagree with the girl's assessment. This was regarded as his comeback movie after a string of box office disappointments turned popular bad film memes, and it did fairly well for him, if not exactly on the blockbuster level his earlier works had enjoyed including and immediately after The Sixth Sense. Wisely he opted not to be too ambitious with this considerably more modest chiller, leaving himself one big twist that was fairly satisfying in its simplicity, though of course there were a contingent of the audience who claimed to have guessed it early on.

But that’s the case with twists, there's always somebody who will tell you it was obvious (fair enough, The Sixth Sense had one that was very guessable, but that was before most people were aware of what this Shyamalan bloke was up to). Here we saw him fall back on what some would say was a lazy form of horror movie making, the found footage effort which by the point this was released increasing numbers of ticket buyers were saying they were getting very sick of, not that it prevented directors utilising the style to their own ends. It had become the mark of either a director on the way up (they hoped) or alternatively on the way down, an attempt to get down with the kids, though The Blair Witch Project had been a while ago by the time this was out.

Perhaps it was that found footage had well and truly become part of the filmic language, with even a Doctor Who episode presented like that the same year as The Visit. Or perhaps it was a bandwagon to jump on, as they seemed so easy to produce, as evinced by all those titles clogging up the quieter end of internet streaming services? Whatever, as you can see it did tend to dominate the discussion whenever it was implemented, largely because it supposed a certain authenticity that many would quibble with, though the most contentious aspect of this was the rapping of the younger brother, which was presumably meant to be endearing but drove many a viewer up the wall in frustration - kid got no flow!

One hopes he was merely taking directions from Shyamalan and hadn't demanded these sequences be included himself, though whichever he would likely look back on them in later years with the kind of cringing embarrassment most of us take from seeing old photographs of ourselves. Only we didn't rap in those. Other than that, the only controversy arose from the none-too-subtle depiction of the old couple the kids spend the week with as the embodiment of everything supposedly disturbing about the elderly, with their failing bodies and mental capacity, and insistence on behaviour that seems baffling to the younger generation. Oh, and it was presented as horrifying that some of them shit themselves and get upset when senility takes its toll, which it is, but mostly for the sufferer. Curious trappings for the cinema of fear, then, and a pity this only went so deep with them before lapsing into the overfamiliar bogeyman territory far too well telegraphed from the start of The Visit. Plus it ends on another poor rap, too.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2893 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

M. Night Shyamalan  (1970 - )

Indian-born, American-raised writer and director, whose forte is taking cliched fantasy stories and reinventing them with low-key treatment, usually with a child at the heart of them. After gentle comedy Wide Awake, he hit the big time with supernatural drama The Sixth Sense. Superhero tale Unbreakable was also successful, as was the religious alien invasion parable Signs. Shyamalan's mystery drama The Village was seen as ploughing the same furrow for too long by some, and his fantasies Lady in the Water, The Happening, The Last Airbender and After Earth (which he didn't conceive the plot for) were met with near-universal derision. On a lower budget, he made The Visit, which was cautiously received as a partial return to form, and Split, which was his biggest hit in some time, along with its sequel Glass, a thoughtful if eccentric take on superheroes. Mid-pandemic he then released horror Old. He also co-wrote Stuart Little.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: