HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
Burning Sea, The
Godzilla Singular Point
Ace of Aces
Innocents, The
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Experiment in Terror Waiting For Your Call
Year: 1962
Director: Blake Edwards
Stars: Glenn Ford, Lee Remick, Ross Martin, Stefanie Powers, Roy Poole, Ned Glass, Anita Loo, Patricia Hudson, Gilbert Green, Clifton James, Al Avalon, William Bryant, Dick Crockett, James Lanphier
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Kelly Sherwood (Lee Remick) drives back to the San Francisco home she shares with her sister Toby (Stefanie Powers) after work at a bank and as she parks the car in the garage and climbs out she notices the door close behind her and suddenly can hear the sound of breathing. Now anxious, she asks if anyone is there and receives her answer swiftly when a man looms up behind her and grabs her round the neck, telling her not to scream. He says he has been watching her closely and knows all about her, also what kind of neighbourhood this is, so he feels pretty confident that nobody will come to her aid right this minute. Then he reaches the crux of the matter: he has a job he wishes Kelly to carry out.

That title was not chosen casually, for as director Blake Edwards had worked in the thriller medium before in his television series Peter Gunn, on film he was better known for his comedies, so he decided to "experiment" and find out if he could successfully create a suspense piece, or as successful as his comedies and romances had been at any rate. The results were favourable, but he never really stayed in the genre, perhaps because he felt he had said all he needed to with this, or otherwise because no matter how well thought of these efforts here were, it was the comedy he was always going to be associated with, and thus pigeonholed he wasn't willing to buck any trends in future.

Certainly he did return to thriller elements, as what were the Pink Panther movies but spoofs of the police whodunit style, but Experiment in Terror remained his most obvious try at leaving out the jokes. This actually paved the way for the cop flicks to come as Hollywood shook off the bonds of film noir in the sixties, though references were still going to be made, and a gritty, more true to life as it was lived (i.e. grim) approach was delivered when the seventies were on their way. You could draw parallels between this and Don Siegel's game changer Dirty Harry, with the straight ahead, no nonsense lawman, Glenn Ford as FBI agent John Ripley, reminiscent of Clint Eastwood if more measured in his demeanour, and they both had significant scenes in a baseball stadium.

And both those sequences ended with the same shot as the movie psychos, utterly reprehensible in each, were at a disadvantage on the diamond. While the title might suggest a horror film, Edwards was more interested in keeping events grounded in reality and therefore a lot of locations shooting was employed, itself a hark back to Andrew L. Stone's Cry Terror! so you could trace this in a line running from the earliest form of the thriller right up to the present, though Experiment in Terror was more a part of where television mysteries and cop shows were going to end up as the small screen dominated the examples in its production line conveyer belt of such diversions. Nevertheless, for a while there it could be regarded as groundbreaking in a manner possibly modest, but significant.

Back at the plot, it was not too convention-disrupting as we still had the damsel (or damsels) in distress to be concerned about when the villain (Ross Martin, gradually revealed) plagues Kelly with telephone calls that make no bones about their menace. He has already made it clear he is keeping a very close watch on her and that he'll know if she contacts the authorities, which she does, that’s how Ripley gets involved as the tough but fair representative of the forces of good, bringing up another aspect that would feed into the more conservative thrillers to come, that the agent of law was going to be living by a very strict code, be that his official job's (see Harry Callaghan) or his own (see Popeye Doyle), both supplying a very moral mindset that they might not necessarily stick to in their actions but obeyed its spirit in bringing down the bad guys. The most rule bending Ripley does is using a stool pigeon (Ned Glass), and this did drag on a shade too long, certainly past the point where you really felt the FBI should have wrapped things up, but its crisp photography and eyes narrowed technique were easy to appreciate. Music by Henry Mancini.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3822 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: