HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Worst Person in the World, The
Whirlpool
Hunter Will Get You
Superman/Batman: Apocalypse
Revolver
Men, The
Parallel Mothers
Sadness, The
Bloody New Year
Faye
Body Count
Spider-Man: No Way Home
'Round Midnight
Wild Men
Barry & Joan
Wake Up Punk
Twin, The
Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy
One of These Days
Lift to the Scaffold
Savage Dawn
Rest in Pieces
Innocents in Paris
We're All Going to the World's Fair
Beyond the Door 3
Jules et Jim
Love Jones
Saint-Narcisse
Souvenir Part II, The
Knockabout
400 Blows, The
Virus: 32
Studio 666
Great Movement, The
Lost in La Mancha
Cellar, The
Sacred Spirit, The
Chess of the Wind
Nineteen Eighty-Four
Scream
   
 
Newest Articles
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
   
 
  Run For Your Wife Taxi For Mr Cooney
Year: 2012
Director: Ray Cooney, John Luton
Stars: Danny Dyer, Denise Van Outen, Sarah Harding, Neil Morrissey, Kellie Shirley, Christopher Biggins, Lionel Blair, Nicholas Le Provist, Ben Cartwright, Derek Griffiths, Nick Wilton, Jeffrey Holland, Louise Michelle, Carli Norris, Judi Dench, Robin Askwith
Genre: ComedyBuy from Amazon
Rating:  2 (from 1 vote)
Review: John Smith (Danny Dyer) is a London taxi driver who has a secret. One night he is on his way home when he sees a bag lady (Judi Dench) being attacked by two muggers who are after her handbag, so he turns hero and steps in, only to get walloped on the head for his trouble. Suffering from concussion, he is taken to hospital for observation and to be bandaged up, but the next morning he is growing increasingly concerned, as is his wife Michelle (Denise Van Outen) because he didn't return home last night. His other wife Stephanie (Sarah Harding) is worried too, and they both try to contact him - that's right, John is a bigamist, and living two lives each wife knows nothing about.

Ray Cooney was in his eighties when his big screen adaptation of his long-running, much-revived farce was released, making him one of Britain's oldest working film directors ever, and if the general reaction was to be believed, one of the worst. As critics and audiences alike lined up to proclaim this one of the most pitiful comedies ever made, the box office takings were so low that you had to wonder how many of those slagging it off had actually seen it, though if they had most of them were assuredly not recommending it to anyone. Cooney made his movie as star-studded as possible, drafting in a selection of his showbiz buddies to fill out cameo roles, though this was about as far from The Player as it was possible to get.

This turned out to be the final acting roles for many of the now-very elderly stars, though many were wishing that had also been the case for leading man Danny Dyer; this was before a part in popular television soap Eastenders happened along to save his bacon. What was more unfortunate was that one of the cameos was from Rolf Harris, playing a busker right under the opening credits (alongside Cliff Richard), which guaranteed this would never be shown on television ever since his very public disgrace and subsequent jail term, but if you thought that wasn't funny, nothing could prepare you for what passed for Cooney's idea of humour as he had updated his original script to reflect changing attitudes.

The attitudes of the nineteen-seventies, or so it seemed, as much of this wouldn't pass muster in a town hall amdram effort. For instance, there was a chocolate cake one character carries around purely so that John's neighbour Gary (Neil Morrissey) managed to sit on it, making it look as if he'd shat himself, though not before he had tested the substance to make sure it really wasn't excrement by tasting it. That was the best they could conjure up to seem cutting edge, you had to assume, yes, it was very silly, but it was played with such exaggerated dimwit demeanour by the blokes and screeching caricature by the ladies that it started tiresome and quickly grew tedious, barely entertaining in a car crash quality.

The plot stuck with Cooney's play more or less faithfully, but there's a difference between playing farce on the stage and in the movies, and this showed that up all too unforgivingly. By the time Christopher Biggins and Lionel Blair have appeared to start, well, blaring, as a gay couple who are John's neighbours at his other flat, it's a stout heart who has made up their mind to stay with this to the bitter end, not least because it was so cheap-looking it less resembled a basic sitcom with its obvious, underdressed sets and suburban locations, and more barely one step up from an instructional video. When the police grow suspicious and get involved with John's dilemma, you are tempted to ask them to arrest the directors as well, just to stop everyone embarrassing themselves any further. It's difficult to know who to recommend this to, as any fans of the material would much prefer to see it in the theatre, and even bad film buffs have their limits. Also featuring the most optimistic last line in the credits ever. Music by Walter Mair.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1852 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Enoch Sneed
   

 

Last Updated: