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Archieved News

  Pearl & Dean's Tumbleweed Trainer [read more]
  The cinema advertiser's cinema advertiser pays tribute to the movies
  Created by London advertising agency, Brothers and Sisters, Tumbleweed Trainer is presented as a spoof 1950s documentary film about the making of a western. The two-minute long film, which was shot in Almeria, Spain, follows the tumbleweed trainer on the set of a western called Duel of Desire as she goes through the arduous and often solitary task of whipping her tumbleweeds into shape. She is described by the narrator as "a lady no self-respecting director could do without".

Tumbleweed Trainer is inspired by a long lost behind-the-scenes documentary about the making of The Searchers, the 1956 John Ford western starring John Wayne.

Brothers and Sisters ensured that a high level of authenticity was applied to every aspect of the Tumbleweed Trainer shoot. Playing homage to the classic era of the Western film genre, the ad is shot in 16mm and 35mm film and the team used vintage recording equipment, including microphones from the 1940s, to make the voiceover. The score was recorded by a real orchestra and the 1950s set workers were allowed to smoke on screen.

Check out the short at the link above.
  Graeme Clark [28 Sep 2016 at 00:43]
     

Untitled 1

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