HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
Ibiza Undead
Wings of Eagles, The
Beats
Body Parts
   
 
Newest Articles
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
Things Have Changed: Films You'd Be Insane to Make Now
   
 
  Touchables, The Under The DomeBuy this film here.
Year: 1968
Director: Robert Freeman
Stars: Judy Huxtable, Ester Anderson, Marilyn Rickard, Kathy Simmonds, David Anthony, James Villiers, Ricki Starr, Harry Baird, Michael Chow, Roy Davies, William Dexter, Bruno Elrington, Peter Gordeno, Danny Lynch, John Ronane, Simon Williams, Bryan Walsh
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Thriller, Weirdo
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: What could be better than a party in a wax museum, especially one displaying the most up-to-date celebrities and luminaries of the day? The guests are certainly enjoying themselves, but among them are four interlopers, a gaggle of beautiful women who have plans of their own; once the celebrations have dwindled and those partygoers have headed home, the girls sneak in and steal the Michael Caine dummy, escorting it from the premises and out into the car park where one of their number places it in the back seat, leaving the other three yelling after her to come back and take them with her. But they have set their sights higher than facsimile celebrities: how about the genuine article?

The Touchables, not a spoof of the gang busting television series The Untouchables it should be noted, is one of the movies most held up as a perfect example of mod cinema, that is the films of the nineteen-sixties that were enraptured with the style of the era, its proponents priding themselves on their impeccable dress sense above all, not to mention a predilection for cappuccinos and scooters thanks to the identification of Italian culture as the apex of cool. What it did not necessarily lend itself to was a great British movie, for the cinema of that time was more interested in Swinging Sixties chic, Carnaby Street and all that, than it was devoted to one particular aspect; just as there were not rockers films flooding the market, their great rivals the mods were not best catered for.

When you saw the quality of this little item, you would only agree that while it looked very fine thanks to director Robert Freeman’s experience with photography (he was The Beatles’ album cover shutterbug of choice for some years), dramatically or even comically, it sank like a stone. What storyline there was concerned the trouble our four largely interchangeable heroines get into when they opt to kidnap a pop star called Christian (David Anthony, a celebrity who never really was) and take him back to their house in the country, all the better to have their wicked way with him. As these ladies are not unattractive, it would seem to be more of a male fantasy than a female one, and sure enough it was all men in the scripting team.

But that team included Donald Cammell, and though his work was rewritten by popular scribe of the day Ian La Frenais, you could discern something of his directorial debut Performance if you looked closely enough, mostly that undercutting of the nature of pop and rock stardom in the situation Christian finds himself in. There is a dark side as he eventually tires of his kidnappers’ company and tries to escape, which has dire consequences, but what most would remember about The Touchables would not especially be the cast, though the foursome were played by Judy Huxtable (wife of Peter Cook for a few years) and Ester Anderson, with Marilyn Rickard and Kathy Simmonds in support, who whether by accident or design summed up the mod girl look (you had to imagine design was very much part of this).

Nope, what you’d recall would be that country house, because it was in effect a huge, clear plastic dome, nothing to do with The Simpsons Movie or a certain Stephen King novel, it was smaller than that, but a presumably very hot in summer construction that Christian is kept in as if he were an ornament, initially tied to a bed, though later allowed table tennis and trampolining, not to mention the obvious stylistic choice of pinball. Meanwhile, as this begins to resemble some hazy consumer satire, difficult to pin down as that was, outside gangsters are looking for the star, led by James Villiers (not the most sinister of performers) and tied in with the professional wrestling circuit, as American grappler Ricki Starr appears as himself, and gets to do his ballet dancing he-man act, though it was strapping Harry Baird who had the most to do in respect to the plot. Even so, the effect of watching what amounted to a collection of artistes fumbling hopelessly for a point was hard to recommend unless you loved the era – the original Nirvana provided the theme song, for instance.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 941 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: