HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Glass
My Brilliant Career
Knife for the Ladies, A
Man in the Attic
Destroyer
Fillmore
Bumblebee
No Kidding
Honkytonk Man
Woman in the Window, The
Shed of the Dead
Dead Easy
Tucked
Widows
Last Movie Star, The
Death Game
Juliet, Naked
November
Arcadia
Sugar Hill
House with the Clock in Its Walls, The
Devil Thumbs a Ride, The
Suspiria
Secret People
Spy Who Dumped Me, The
Beautiful Stranger
House That Jack Built, The
Undercover
White Chamber
R.P.M.
Summer of 84
On Secret Service
Survive!
My Sister Eileen
Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween
Last Picture Show, The
Pathfinder
Skatetown, USA
Donbass
He Loves Me... He Loves Me Not
   
 
Newest Articles
Tucked: The Derren Nesbitt Interview
Locomotion Pictures: The Best of British Transport Films on Blu-ray
Roman Scandals: Extreme Visions from Ancient Rome
Spider-Wrong and Spider-Right: The Dragon's Challenge and Into the Spider-Verse
Monster Dog: Cujo on Blu-ray
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
Between the Wars: Babylon Berlin Series 1&2 on DVD
Hard Luck Story: Detour on Blu-ray
Oh, What Happened to You? The Likely Lads on Blu-ray
Killer Apps: The Rise of the Evil 60s Supercomputers
How 1970s Can You Get? Cliff Richard in Take Me High vs Never Too Young to Rock
A Perfect Engine, An Eating Machine: The Jaws Series
Phwoar, Missus! Sexytime for Hollywood
   
 
  Leprechaun 2 The Little Green ManBuy this film here.
Year: 1994
Director: Rodman Flender
Stars: Warwick Davis, Charlie Heath, Shevonne Durkin, Sandy Baron, Adam Biesk, James Lancaster, Linda Hopkins, Arturo Gil, Kimmy Robertson, Clint Howard, Andrew Craig, David Powledge, Billy Beck, Al White, Martha Hackett, Jonathan R. Perkins, Tony Cox
Genre: Horror, Comedy
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: A thousand years ago in Ireland, William O'Day (James Lancaster) was trying to flee his master through the forest in the dead of night but the collar that had been attached to him had supernatural properties and stopped him in his tracks. Then his master appeared: the Leprechaun (Warwick Davis) who has him in his magic thrall, but promises his freedom if he allows him to get married. It's who the little creature is being married to which proves the problem: he takes William to spy on the woman he has his eye on and she turns out to be his own daughter (Shevonne Durkin), much to the man's horror. But he gives in for the gift of being set free and runs off, though the Leprechaun won't allow him to get away that easily...

That's the thing about the Leprechaun, there's always a catch, always a clause in the contract to see that he has the upper hand eventually, which was clear when this sequel was the first of five to grace the video stores of the world, though this second instalment actually saw the inside of cinemas as its original had. That said, there was more chance to rent this of an evening to appreciate over the beer and pizza than there was to enjoy it over a bucket of popcorn, and perhaps of all the horror franchises of the nineties this was best suited to home video when expectations were far from high. In effect, this series was the horror movie equivalent of an Irish theme pub.

If that makes you cringe, then that was all to the good as far as Warwick Davis was concerned, because from the outset this had leaned on the humour of its premise, recognising it was really rather silly instead of very scary. Was there anyone who had been scared by a Leprechaun film apart from Garth from Wayne's World? We're not counting the genuinely freaky Disney favourite Darby O'Gill and the Little People, since that did frighten whole generations of young movie fans, an effect a million miles away from what was dreamed up by the creation here which was more groaning at the jokes and laughing at how shamelessly idiotic it was willing to get for its goals of cheesy entertainment.

In this case, imagine if Freddy Kreuger had shrunk three feet but could still conjure up the magic powers and you had some idea of the nonsense played out before you in Leprechaun 2. While Davis was patently relishing his role with its corny jokes and daft rhymes, his Irish accent hadn't improved from the first instalment, which funnily enough was very fitting for an American production showing its typically tone deaf treatment of all things hailing from the Emerald Isle; most Irish would be used to the idea of what their nation brought out in those across the Atlantic, with this the equivalent of getting hammered on St. Patrick's Day and trying to invent some kind of amusement in the process. Here the little guy was still planning to get wed some thousand years later in the present of the nineties, to the same girl, too (what a weird way to spell Siobhan).

Well, the same actress anyway, as Bridget is the looky-likey descendant of the woman in the prologue, but the Leprechaun has reckoned without the plucky presence of her boyfriend Cody (Charlie Heath), who like her is finishing school and creating an income by drumming up custom for the death tour of Los Angeles his uncle Morty (Sandy Baron) runs, or would if he was not falling over drunk most of the time. That one couple Cody persuades into the customised hearse is Clint Howard and Kimmy Robertson (of Twin Peaks) should give you some idea of the calibre of material in store, but by that point we had already had an earful of Davis's creaky quips so were well prepared. That this was relentlessly foolish was no impediment to the chuckle factor, and watching the villain contrive both gory deaths in his Irish theme movie (death by pot o' gold, er, lawnmower, um coffee urn... OK, inspiration was thin on the ground) and his machination towards his wedding was stupidly diverting. On video in the UK it was known as One Wedding and Lots of Funerals, that's the level of it. Music by Jonathan Elias.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1125 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Rodman Flender  (1964 - )

American director and horror fan who got his break from Roger Corman. Mostly works in television, but has helmed the first Leprechaun sequel and gruesome comedy Idle Hands.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Derrick Smith
Paul Shrimpton
Darren Jones
George White
Stately Wayne Manor
   

 

Last Updated: