HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Ciambra, The
Reflection of Fear, A
Aurora Encounter, The
Breaking In
Breaking In
Please Stand By
Cockeyed Cowboys of Calico County, The
Deadpool 2
Smart Money
Lupin the Third vs. Detective Conan: The Movie
Gangsta
3 Nuts in Search of a Bolt
Magic Serpent, The
That's Not Me
There Goes the Bride
Billy the Kid versus Dracula
Liquid Sword
I, Tonya
Universal Soldier: Regeneration
Bad Match
Güeros
Anchor and Hope
One, The
Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie
Lucky
Still of the Night
Home Sweet Homicide
Mannaja - A Man Called Blade
Spitfire
Killers from Space
   
 
Newest Articles
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 2
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 1
I-Spy Scotland: The Thirty Nine Steps and Eye of the Needle
Manor On Movies--Black Shampoo--three three three films in one
Manor On Movies--Invasion USA
Time Trap: Last Year in Marienbad and La Jetée
Gaining Three Stone: Salvador, Natural Born Killers and Savages
Right Said Bernard: Cribbins on DVD
1969: The Year Westerns Couldn't Get Past
A Network Horror Double Bill: Assault and Death Line on Blu-ray
The Edie Levy: Edie Sedgwick, Andy Warhol and Ciao! Manhattan
The Ultimate Trip: The Original Psychedelic Movies
Players of Games: Willy Wonka, Tron and Ready Player One
What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round? The Ends of The Monkees
Flings and Arrows: Conquest vs Flesh + Blood
   
 
  Prom Night III: The Last Kiss Teen Queen Murder MachineBuy this film here.
Year: 1990
Director: Ron Oliver, Peter R. Simpson
Stars: Tim Conlon, Cynthia Preston, David Stratton, Courtney Taylor, Dylan Neal, Jeremy Ratchford, Roger Dunn, Tom Nursall, George Chuvalo, London Juno, Lesley Kelly, Terry Doyle, Robert Collins, Nicole Evans, Sabrina Boudot
Genre: Horror, Comedy
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Three years on from the events in Hello Mary Lou: Prom Night Two (1987), demon bombshell Mary-Lou Maloney (Courtney Taylor) resides in hell, chained alongside a chorus line of scantily-clad cuties forced to dance endlessly to Fifties doo-wop music. No, really. Inevitably, Mary-Lou busts free and returns to haunt her old high school seducing teenager Alex Grey (Tim Conlon) who goes from lovable loser to cold shouldering his sweet girlfriend Sarah (Cynthia Preston). Thanks to Mary-Lou's evil intervention a hitherto hapless Alex excels on the football field and aces every one of his term papers. Unfortunately her help involves bumping off anyone that gets in Alex's way, whether jabbing an electric whisk through the throat of his chocolate-chomping chemistry teacher, acid-melting the face off his bitchy guidance counselor or impaling the school bully with a drillbit-topped football. At first Alex doesn't seem to mind. All he has to do to maintain this winning streak is bury a few bodies and enjoy amazing sex with his gorgeous new girlfriend. Gradually both his conscience and abiding love for Sarah get the better of him, but of course hell hath no fury like a demon woman scorned.

Few remember there was a third film in the Prom Night franchise although the saga carried on even further with the release of Prom Night Night IV: Deliver Us from Evil (1992) starring lovely Nicole de Boer of Cube (1997) and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine fame. Like that film Prom Night III went straight to video. Continuing the supernatural theme established in the second sequel the film seemingly takes its cue from the increasingly juvenile, rapidly deteriorating A Nightmare on Elm Street sequels as it strings together a load of cartoon-like, special effects driven set-pieces wherein Mary-Lou kills people in imaginative ways. Just like Freddy Krueger she has a fried face and deadly fingernails, a line in cheesy one-liners and adopts an array of outlandish guises: ice cream vendor, all-American housewife, prison guard, trash-talking hairdresser. Sherilyn Fenn look-alike Courtney Taylor lacks the striking otherworldly presence of original Mary-Lou (Lisa Schrage) but makes the role her own exhibiting a flair for campy comedy. She also performs a memorable striptease by the window while Alex struggles to bury her latest victim, after which the filmmakers intercut a sex scene with the disposal of the corpse. Yecch.

Unlike the previous sequel, this is much more certain about what it wants to be which is a kitsch comedy somewhat similar to a Hanna-Barbera cartoon but with extreme gore. Promoted to the co-director this time around, series screenwriter Ron Oliver goes all out for ghoulish gags with a retro-Fifties theme including jokey nods Dragnet, The Wild One (1953), vintage educational films, EC comics and Sandra Dee. Working alongside Scottish born producer Peter R. Simpson (in his only directing credit), Oliver proves a creative if not always consistent force behind the camera making use of wild angles, Sam Raimi-style dolly shots and maintaining a fast pace. A good few jokes hit their mark notably the news report that blames Alex's murder spree on "bad dietary habits, rock music and too many horror movies", the cop held hostage who attempts to strike up a conversation ("So this is your first kidnapping, huh?"), bizarre monologues from Alex's oddball best friend Shane (David Stratton) and frankly unhinged dad, and a running gag involving some surreal announcements over the campus radio ("Attention all girls on the weight-lifting team. The facial hair removal clinic is now open. Attendance is mandatory!"). Future sit-com regular Tim Conlon and especially Cynthia Preston prove more engaging protagonists than are common in such fare. Preston proved something of an Eighties horror favourite having acquitted herself admirably in cult Canadian efforts Pin (1988) and The Brain (1988). She proves especially winning at the lively finale where Sarah grabs a flamethrower and plunges straight into a retro-Fifties themed hell to confront the undead denizens of a zombie prom night along with a malevolent jukebox that shoots lethal vinyl. Although the downbeat ending seems at odds with the overall tone, Prom Night III still provides silly, imaginative fun.

Click here for the trailer

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 981 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Steven Seagal
Pam Grier
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
  Patrick Keenan
Enoch Sneed
Ian Phillips
  Afra Khan
  Dan Malone
   

 

Last Updated: